Authentication Services 4.2 - Administration Guide

One Identity Privileged Access Suite for Unix Introducing One Identity Authentication Services Unix administration and configuration Identity management Migrating from NIS Managing access control Managing local file permissions Certificate Autoenrollment Integrating with other applications Managing Unix hosts with Group Policy
Authentication Services Group Policy
Group Policy Concepts Unix policies One Identity policies
Display specifiers Troubleshooting

Account Override policies

Group Policy provides policies to manage the user-override and group-override files. The user-override file allows you to override certain user attributes such as the login shell or home directory. The group-override file allows you to override certain group attributes such as group name and group membership list.

Account Override policies support non-tattooing, block inheritance, ACL filtering, and enforced settings. If an Account Override policy is enforced, then entries in that policy cannot be overridden. When there are no Account Override policies associated with the Unix agent, a Group Policy refresh returns the local override files to their original states.

If there are multiple policies affecting the same override entry, then the user or group override is dictated by the lowest policy in the hierarchy affecting that user or group or the highest enforced policy affecting that user or group in the hierarchy.

Group Policy creates the user-override and group-override files on the system if they do not already exist. It merges the policy-defined entries with the existing local entries and prunes the duplicates. The policy settings override local settings.

User Account Override policy

The User Account Override policy allows administrators to add users to the override list and selectively set account attributes for those users. This policy manages the Authentication Services user-override file, which allows specified users to take on a different identity on a per-machine basis.

To add a user override entry

  1. Start Group Policy Editor.
  2. Navigate to the Unix Settings | Quest Authentication Services | Identity Mapping node.
  3. Double-click User Account Override to open the User Account Override Properties dialog.
  4. Click Add.

    The User Account Override dialog opens initially with all fields disabled except the Apply To field.

  5. Enter the specific DOMAIN\sAMAccountName or a * in the Apply To field.

    Note:

    • A * indicates all Authentication Services users.
    • Authentication Services ignores a non-existent user in the Apply To field.

    Thus, only the Primary GID, Home Directory, and Login Shell fields are valid. All other fields are disabled.

  6. Click Browse.

    The Select User or Group dialog opens.

  7. Enter a user or group name to select. Or, type the first letter of a name and click Check Names for Group Policy to find Authentication Services-enabled users in Active Directory. Once you locate the names, click OK and return to the User Account Override dialog.
  8. Enter override values for the Primary GID, Home Directory, and Login Shell user attributes and click OK.

    The entry displays in the list of account override settings. Scroll the list or adjust column widths to view all of the account settings.

  9. Click OK to save settings and close the dialog.

Group Account Override policy

By using Group Account Override, you can add local users to Active Directory groups. The Group Account Override policy allows administrators to append a group membership list to the list stored in Active Directory. You can also override the group name and GID (group ID) fields.

To add a group override entry

  1. Start Group Policy Editor.
  2. Navigate to the Unix Settings | Quest Authentication Services | Identity Mapping node.
  3. Double-click Group Account Override to open the Group Account Override Properties dialog.
  4. Click the ... button next to the Windows Group box.

    The Select Group dialog displays.

  5. Enter a group name and click OK.
  6. Enter a new Unix Group Name. The group will have this name on all Unix agents linked to this policy. Leave this field blank if you do not want to override the group name.
  7. Under Members, type a user name in the User field and click Insert.

    Group Policy adds the local user name you specify to the group membership list.

  8. Click OK to return to the Group Account Override Properties dialog.
  9. Click OK to save settings and close the dialog.

Host Access Control policy

The Host Access Control policies give you fine-grained control over which users are allowed to log into the Unix host.

Authentication Services supports host access control through the users.allow and users.deny files. Authentication Services consults these files to determine whether or not to allow access to a particular user. This is an effective way to restrict access to sensitive computers on the network when using decentralized user accounts such as Active Directory. Group Policy defines policies for management of the access control files.

Host access control entries are "append only" and cannot be overridden. However, if there is a duplicate entry, the entry is only added once to the access control files.

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