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One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions 5.8.0 - Administration Guide

Preface Introduction The concepts of SPS The Welcome Wizard and the first login Basic settings User management and access control Managing SPS
Controlling SPS: reboot, shutdown Managing Safeguard for Privileged Sessions clusters Managing a high availability SPS cluster Upgrading SPS Managing the SPS license Accessing the SPS console Sealed mode Out-of-band management of SPS Managing the certificates used on SPS
General connection settings HTTP-specific settings ICA-specific settings RDP-specific settings SSH-specific settings Telnet-specific settings VMware Horizon View connections VNC-specific settings Indexing audit trails Using the Search (classic) interface Using the Search interface Searching session data on a central node in a cluster Advanced authentication and authorization techniques Reports The SPS RPC API The SPS REST API SPS scenarios Troubleshooting SPS Configuring external devices Using SCP with agent-forwarding Security checklist for configuring SPS Jumplists for in-product help Third-party contributions About us

Encrypting audit trails

Purpose:

To prevent unauthorized access to the audit trail files, SPS can encrypt:

  • The entire trail.

  • The entire trail, and the upstream part with an additional (set of) certificate(s).

  • Only the upstream part.

With upstream encryption, the passwords are visible only with the private key of the certificate used for encrypting the upstream traffic.

NOTE:

Even if the upstream traffic is encrypted with a separate certificate, only one audit trail file is created for a session.

Caution:

SPS 5 F4 and later versions use a new encryption algorithm to encrypt the recorded audit trails (AES128-GCM). This change has the following effects:

  • If you are using external indexers to index your audit trails, you must upgrade them to the latest version. Earlier versions will not be able to index encrypted audit trails recorded with SPS 5 F4 and later.

  • To replay an encrypted audit trail recorded with SPS 5 F4 or later, you can use the latest version of the Safeguard Desktop Player application, or the browser-based player of SPS. You cannot replay such audit trails using earlier versions of Safeguard Desktop Player, nor any version of the Audit Player application.

Encrypting the upstream part has the following limitations:

  • During indexing, command detection does not work without the upstream encryption keys.

TIP:

For more information on uploading certificates for indexing and replaying audit trails, see:

Encrypting audit trails requires one or more X.509 certificate in PEM format that uses an RSA key, depending on the configuration.

NOTE:

Certificates are used as a container and delivery mechanism. For encryption and decryption, only the keys are used.

One Identity recommends using 2048-bit RSA keys (or stronger).

Use every keypair or certificate only for one purpose. Do not reuse cryptographic keys or certificates, for example, do not use the certificate of the SPS webserver to encrypt audit trails, or do not use the same keypair for signing and encrypting data.

The following encryption options are available:

  • Encrypt with a single certificate. This is the most simple approach: SPS uses one certificate to encrypt the audit trails, and anyone who has the private key of that certificate can replay the audit trails. If that key is lost, there is no way to open the audit trails.

  • Encrypt separately with multiple certificates. SPS uses two or more certificates separately to encrypt the audit trails, and anyone who has the private key of one of the encryption certificates can replay the audit trails.

  • Encrypt jointly with two certificates. SPS uses two certificates together (a certificate-pair) to encrypt the audit trails. The private keys of both encryption certificates are needed to replay the audit trails. This is a kind of "four-eyes in auditing".

You can combine the different encryption methods, so for example it is possible to encrypt the audit trails with multiple certificate-pairs, and to replay the trails only if the private keys of a certificate-pair are available. This is true for encrypting the upstream traffic as well. At the extreme, you will need four private keys to fully replay an audit trail: two to open the normal traffic, and two more to display the upstream traffic.

Note that SPS itself cannot create the certificates used to encrypt the audit trails.

TIP:

If two certificates are displayed in a row, they are a certificate-pair and you need the private key of both to replay the audit trails. If two certificates are displayed in separate rows, you need the one of the private keys to replay the audit trails. If there are multiple rows containing two certificates, you need the private keys of the certificate(s) listed in any of the rows.

Figure 146: Policies > Audit Policies — Encrypting audit trails: joint encryption with a certificate pair

Each audit policy can have up to 8 lines of certificate pairs.

Steps:
  1. Navigate to Policies > Audit Policies and select the audit policy you will use in your connections.

    TIP:

    By default, every connection uses the built-in default audit policy. Unless you use a custom audit policy, modifying the default audit policy will affect every audited channel of the connections passing through SPS.

  2. Select the Enable encryption option.

  3. To upload a certificate for encrypting the entire trail:

    1. Click the icon under the Encryption cert (X.509 RSA) 4-eyes cert (X.509 RSA) row.

    2. Click on the left icon and upload a certificate to SPS. This certificate will be used to encrypt the audit trails, and it must not include the private key.

      NOTE:

      To replay the audit trails, you need the private key of the certificate on the computer running the Safeguard Desktop Player application.

    3. Optional step: To encrypt the audit trails jointly with another certificate, click on the right icon and upload a certificate to SPS. Note that the private key of both certificates will be required to replay the audit trails.

    4. Repeat these steps to encrypt the audit trails separately with additional certificates.

  4. To upload a certificate for encrypting the upstream traffic:

    1. Select Encrypt upstream traffic with different certificates.

    2. Click the icon under the Encryption cert (X.509 RSA) 4-eyes cert (X.509 RSA) row.

    3. Click on the left icon and upload a certificate to SPS. This certificate will be used to encrypt the audit trails, and it must not include the private key.

      NOTE:

      To replay the upstream part of the audit trails, you need the private key of the certificate on the computer running the Safeguard Desktop Player application.

    4. Optional step: To encrypt the audit trails jointly with another certificate, click on the right icon and upload a certificate to SPS. Note that the private key of both certificates will be required to replay the audit trails.

    5. Repeat these steps to encrypt the upstream separately with additional certificates.

  5. Click Commit.

Timestamping audit trails with built-in timestamping service

Purpose:

To add timestamps to the audit trails by using the built-in timestamping service of SPS, complete the following steps:

Steps:
  1. Configure the timestamping interval. You have to repeat these steps for each protocol (HTTP, ICA, RDP, SSH, Telnet, and VNC) you want to configure:

    Figure 147: <Protocol name> Control > Global Options —Configuring local timestamping

    1. In the protocol control settings, navigate to Global Options > Timestamping (for example, SSH Control > Global Options > Timestamping).

    2. Select Local.

      NOTE:

      Make sure that you leave the Timestamping policy field empty. Timestamping policy has relevance only when Timestamping is set to Remote.

    3. Set the Signing interval. You can choose any value between 10 and 100 000 seconds.

      NOTE:

      The same interval setting applies to timestamping and signing.

    4. Click Commit.

  2. Configure audit policies to use timestamping. You have to repeat these steps for each audit policy you want to configure:

    1. Navigate to Policies > Audit Policies and select the audit policy you will use in your connections.

      TIP:

      By default, every connection uses the built-in default audit policy. Unless you use a custom audit policy, modifying the default audit policy will affect every audited channel of the connections passing through SPS.

    2. Select the Enable timestamping option.

      Figure 148: Policies > Audit Policies — Timestamping audit trails

    3. Click Commit. SPS will automatically add timestamps to the audit trails of every connection that is audited and uses this audit policy.

      NOTE:

      For details on how to change the certificate used for timestamping, see Managing the certificates used on SPS.

Timestamping audit trails with external timestamping service

Purpose:

To request timestamps from a remote Timestamping Authority (TSA), complete the following steps:

Steps:
  1. Configure the remote TSA, and the timestamping interval. You have to repeat these steps for each protocol (HTTP, ICA, RDP, SSH, Telnet, and VNC) you want to configure:

    Figure 149: <Protocol name> Control > Global Options — Configuring a remote TSA

    1. In the protocol control settings, navigate to Global Options > Timestamping (for example, SSH Control > Global Options > Timestamping).

    2. Select Remote.

    3. Enter the address of the timestamping server into the URL field. Note that currently only plain HTTP services are supported, password-protected and HTTPS services are not supported.

    4. If the Timestamping Server has timestamping policies configured, enter the OID of the policy to use into the Timestamping policy field. SPS will include this ID in the timestamping requests sent to the TSA.

    5. Set the Signing interval. You can choose any value between 10 and 100 000 seconds.

      NOTE:

      The same interval setting applies to timestamping and signing.

    6. Click Commit.

  2. Configure audit policies to use timestamping. You have to repeat these steps for each audit policy you want to configure:

    1. Navigate to Policies > Audit Policies and select the audit policy you will use in your connections.

      TIP:

      By default, every connection uses the built-in default audit policy. Unless you use a custom audit policy, modifying the default audit policy will affect every audited channel of the connections passing through SPS.

    2. Select the Enable timestamping option.

      Figure 150: Policies > Audit Policies — Timestamping audit trails

    3. Click Commit. SPS will automatically add timestamps to the audit trails of every connection that is audited and uses this audit policy.

Digitally signing audit trails

Purpose:

SPS can digitally sign the audit trails to prevent the manipulation of the audit trail files. This requires an X.509 certificate and also the private key of the certificate. Note that SPS can generate a private key that you can use to create a certificate, but SPS itself cannot create the certificate used to sign the audit trails.

Steps:
  1. Configure the signing interval. You have to repeat these steps for each protocol (HTTP, ICA, RDP, SSH, Telnet, and VNC) you want to configure:

    Figure 151: <Protocol name> Control > Global Options — Configuring the signing interval

    1. In the protocol control settings, navigate to Global Options > Timestamping (for example, SSH Control > Global Options > Timestamping).

    2. Set the Signing interval. You can choose any value between 10 and 100 000 seconds.

      NOTE:

      The same interval setting applies to timestamping and signing.

    3. Click Commit.

  2. Navigate to Policies > Audit Policies and select the audit policy you will use in your connections.

    Figure 152: Policies > Audit Policies — Signing audit trails

    TIP:

    By default, every connection uses the built-in default audit policy. Unless you use a custom audit policy, modifying the default audit policy will affect every audited channel of the connections passing through SPS.

  3. Select the Enable signing option.

  4. Upload a certificate and the corresponding private key to SPS.

  5. Click Commit. SPS will automatically sign the audit trails of every connection that is audited and uses this audit policy.

  6. Repeat the above steps for other audit policies if needed.

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