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One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions 5.8.0 - Administration Guide

Preface Introduction The concepts of SPS The Welcome Wizard and the first login Basic settings User management and access control Managing SPS
Controlling SPS: reboot, shutdown Managing Safeguard for Privileged Sessions clusters Managing a high availability SPS cluster Upgrading SPS Managing the SPS license Accessing the SPS console Sealed mode Out-of-band management of SPS Managing the certificates used on SPS
General connection settings HTTP-specific settings ICA-specific settings RDP-specific settings SSH-specific settings Telnet-specific settings VMware Horizon View connections VNC-specific settings Indexing audit trails Using the Search (classic) interface Using the Search interface Searching session data on a central node in a cluster Advanced authentication and authorization techniques Reports The SPS RPC API The SPS REST API SPS scenarios Troubleshooting SPS Configuring external devices Using SCP with agent-forwarding Security checklist for configuring SPS Jumplists for in-product help Third-party contributions About us

HTTP-specific settings

The following sections describe configuration settings available only for the HTTP protocol. Use the following policies to control who, when, and how can access the HTTP connection. For details on configuring Channel Policies, see Creating and editing channel policies. For a list of supported client applications, see Supported protocols and client applications.

Auditing HTTP and HTTPS connections is possible in both transparent and non-transparent modes. SPS can also be used as an HTTP/HTTPS proxy to simplify client configuration and integration into your network environment, or it can forward HTTP traffic, behaving as a HTTP tunnel.

  • Channel Policy: The HTTP protocol has only one channel type with no special configuration options. The available channel policy options are the following: From, Target, Time policy, Record audit trail, and Remote groups. Note that the Remote groups option is used only if the user performs inband authentication using one of the supported HTTP authentication methods (see Authentication in HTTP and HTTPS). To retrieve the groups of an authenticated user from an LDAP database, you must also set an LDAP Server in the Connection Policy (for HTTP/HTTPS connections, SPS uses this server only to retrieve the group membership of authenticated users, you cannot authenticate the users to LDAP from SPS). For details on configuring these options, see Creating and editing channel policies.

    When setting Target, note the following:

    • If the connection uses DNAT (NAT destination address), the target address of the original client will be compared to the Target parameter of the Channel policy, that is not necessarily equivalent with the server's address.

    • If the connection is redirected to a Fix address, the redirected address will be compared to the Target parameter of the Channel policy.

  • HTTP connections: For details, see Setting up HTTP connections.

  • HTTP sessions: HTTP settings determine the parameters of the connection on the protocol level, including timeout value, and so on. For details, see Session-handling in HTTP.

  • HTTP settings: HTTP settings determine the parameters of the connection on the protocol level, including timeout value, and so on. For details, see Creating and editing protocol-level HTTP settings.

Limitations in handling HTTP connections

Avoid using the IP address configured for administrator or user login on SPS when configuring HTTP or SSH connections.

The current version of SPS does not support the following features that are available for other protocols:

  • Gateway authentication

  • Four-eyes authorization

  • Usermapping policies

  • User authentication to LDAP servers

Forwarding HTTP connections to an HTTP proxy is not supported. If your clients use an HTTP proxy to access the target servers, place SPS behind the proxy: Clients - HTTP Proxy - SPS.

Caution:

The Clients - SPS - HTTP Proxy scenario is NOT supported.

Authentication in HTTP and HTTPS

For the audited HTTP and HTTPS connections, SPS supports the following inband authentication methods for the HTTP protocol. These authentication methods are automatically supported for every Connection policy, without further configuration.

  • Basic Access Authentication (according to RFC2617

  • The NTLM authentication method commonly used by Microsoft browsers, proxies, and servers

SPS records the username used in the authentication process into the Username and Remote username fields of the connection database.

For authenticated sessions, SPS can perform group-based user authorization that allows you to finetune access to your servers and services: you can set the required group membership in the Channel policy of the HTTP connection. Note that group-based authorization in HTTP works only for authenticated sessions (for HTTP/HTTPS connections, SPS uses this server only to retrieve the group membership of authenticated users, you cannot authenticate the users to LDAP from SPS). If a username is not available for the session, SPS will permit the connection even if the Remote groups field is set.

SPS does not store failed HTTP authentication attempts in the connection database. This means that the Verdict field of the Search page will never contain CONN-AUTH-FAIL values for HTTP connections.

Note that authentication also affects the way SPS handles HTTP sessions. For details, see Session-handling in HTTP.

Setting up HTTP connections

This section focuses on describing the HTTP-specific details of connection configuration. For a detailed description on configuring connections, see General connection settings.

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