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One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions 5.9.0 - Administration Guide

Preface Introduction The concepts of SPS The Welcome Wizard and the first login Basic settings User management and access control Managing SPS
Controlling SPS: reboot, shutdown Managing Safeguard for Privileged Sessions clusters Managing a high availability SPS cluster Upgrading SPS Managing the SPS license Accessing the SPS console Sealed mode Out-of-band management of SPS Managing the certificates used on SPS
General connection settings HTTP-specific settings ICA-specific settings RDP-specific settings SSH-specific settings Telnet-specific settings VMware Horizon View connections VNC-specific settings Indexing audit trails Using the Search (classic) interface Using the Search interface Searching session data on a central node in a cluster Advanced authentication and authorization techniques Reports The SPS RPC API The SPS REST API SPS scenarios Troubleshooting SPS Configuring external devices Using SCP with agent-forwarding Security checklist for configuring SPS Jumplists for in-product help Third-party contributions About us

Controlling SPS: reboot, shutdown

To reboot or shut down SPS, navigate to Basic Settings > System > System control > This node and click the respective action button. The Other node refers to the slave node of a high availability SPS cluster. For details on high availability clusters, see Managing a high availability SPS cluster.

Caution:
  • When rebooting the nodes of a cluster, reboot the other (slave) node first to avoid unnecessary takeovers.

  • When shutting down the nodes of a cluster, shut down the other (slave) node first. When powering on the nodes, start the master node first to avoid unnecessary takeovers.

  • When both nodes are running, avoid interrupting the connection between the nodes: do not unplug the Ethernet cables, reboot the switch or router between the nodes (if any), or disable the HA interface of SPS.

Figure 83: Basic Settings > System > System Control — Performing basic management

NOTE:

Web sessions to the SPS interface are persistent and remain open after rebooting SPS, so you do not have to relogin after a reboot.

During the reboot process, SPS displays information about the progress of the reboot and any possible problems in the following places:

  • On the web interface of SPS, at any of the Listening addresses configured at Basic settings > Local Services > Web login (admin and user). (After booting, you are directed to the login screen of SPS.)

  • On the console, which you can monitor with IPMI (ILOM) or console access.

The information displayed in the browser and on the console is the same.

Disabling controlled traffic

Purpose:

To temporarily disable some or all of the controlled traffic to the protected servers, complete the following steps:

Figure 84: Basic Settings > System > Traffic control — Disabling the controlled traffic

Caution:

Disabling traffic that way is only temporary. Connections will be enabled again after committing any other change from the SPS web interface. For details on how to permanently disable a type of traffic, see Disabling controlled traffic permanently.

NOTE:

Disabling the traffic affects only the traffic configured in the Connection policies, other traffic can pass SPS even if the all traffic is disabled. For details on configuring Connection policies, see General connection settings.

Steps:
  1. Navigate to the Basic Settings > System > Traffic control.

    • To disable SSH traffic, click Stop in the SSH traffic field. Note that this also stops all other traffic forwarded in SSH, for example X11.

    • To disable RDP traffic, click Stop in the RDP traffic field.

    • To disable Telnet and TN3270 traffic, click Stop in the Telnet traffic field.

    • To disable VNC traffic, click Stop in the VNC traffic field.

    • To disable all types of traffic, click Stop in the All services field.

    The System monitor displays the status of all types of traffic.

Disabling controlled traffic permanently

NOTE:

Disabling the traffic affects only the traffic configured in the Connection policies, other traffic can pass SPS even if the all traffic is disabled. For details on configuring Connection policies, see General connection settings.

Steps:
  1. Figure 85: <Protocol name> Control > Global Options — Disabling the controlled traffic persistently

    Navigate to the Global Options page of the traffic type you want to disable, for example to SSH Control > Global Options to disable SSH traffic.

  2. Set the Traffic > Service field to disabled.

  3. Click Commit.

Managing Safeguard for Privileged Sessions clusters

NOTE:

Cluster management is currently an experimental feature of Safeguard for Privileged Sessions, therefore One Identity recommends using it at your own risk.

When you have a set of two or more Safeguard for Privileged Sessions instances in your deployment, you have the possibility to join them into a cluster, and manage them from one central location. You can monitor their status and update their configuration centrally, and you can also search all session data recorded by all nodes in the cluster on a single node. This is achieved by assigning roles to the individual nodes in your cluster: you can set one of your Safeguard for Privileged Sessions nodes to be the Central Management node and the rest of the nodes are managed from this central node.

NOTE:

One Identity recommends managing not more than a few tens of instances from the Central Management node.

Nodes in the cluster connect to each other using IPsec.

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