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One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions 5.9.0 - Administration Guide

Preface Introduction The concepts of SPS The Welcome Wizard and the first login Basic settings User management and access control Managing SPS
Controlling SPS: reboot, shutdown Managing Safeguard for Privileged Sessions clusters Managing a high availability SPS cluster Upgrading SPS Managing the SPS license Accessing the SPS console Sealed mode Out-of-band management of SPS Managing the certificates used on SPS
General connection settings HTTP-specific settings ICA-specific settings RDP-specific settings SSH-specific settings Telnet-specific settings VMware Horizon View connections VNC-specific settings Indexing audit trails Using the Search (classic) interface Using the Search interface Searching session data on a central node in a cluster Advanced authentication and authorization techniques Reports The SPS RPC API The SPS REST API SPS scenarios Troubleshooting SPS Configuring external devices Using SCP with agent-forwarding Security checklist for configuring SPS Jumplists for in-product help Third-party contributions About us

Enabling SPS to act as a HTTP proxy

Purpose:

To enable SPS to act as a HTTP proxy, perform the following steps.

Figure 161: HTTP Control > Connections — Act as HTTP proxy

Steps:
  1. Enable Act as HTTP proxy to configure the client to use SPS as a HTTP proxy.

    You can use SPS as a HTTP proxy through TLS. All traffic between the browser and SPS is tunneled through TLS.

    To use this feature, ensure that the client software can establish secure web proxy connections and supports client software configuration, such as, proxy auto-configuration files.

    For information about making browser specific settings for Chromium, see Secure Web Proxy.

  2. Select whether you want encrypted web proxy connection between the HTTP client and SPS.

    Since there is now a secure channel between the web browser and SPS, you can also enable proxy authentication. This makes it possible for the web browser to do an inband gateway authentication to SPS before being able to issue HTTP requests through SPS.

    • To disable encryption between the HTTP client and SPS, select Disabled.

      NOTE:

      Since the forwarded data may contain sensitive information, One Identity recommends using encryption between the HTTP client and SPS.

    • To use encryption between the HTTP client and SPS, select one of the following options:
      • To use a fix certificate, select Use the same certificate for each connection and copy or upload the certificate.
      • To generate a certificate on-the-fly, signed by a provided Signing CA, select Generate certificate on-the-fly. It uses the parameters of the signing CA, excluding the CN field, which is filled with the name of the target host name.

        NOTE:

        When Generate certificate on-the-fly is selected, and the connection is in transparent setup, the CN field is filled in using SNI (Server Name Indication). When the client does not support SNI, the CN will contain the target IP, which may cause certificate verification warning on the client browser.

  3. Select Inband destination selection as Target.

  4. To permit access to any HTTP servers, enter 0.0.0.0/0 into the Domain field. Alternatively, enter the IP address or subnet of the HTTP address you want permit access to. For IPv6 addresses, add ::/0 as well.

  5. To permit HTTP access to the destination servers on any port, leave the Domain > Port field empty. Otherwise, clients will be permitted only to access the specified port.

  6. Enter the port where SPS should accept HTTP connections into the To > Port field. The default port number when using the Act as HTTP proxy setting is 3128. This value should be the same as the proxy port setting on your clients.

  7. Ensure that you have set SPS as proxy on the clients.

Enabling SSL encryption in HTTP

Purpose:

To enable SSL encryption, perform the following steps. This setting either enforces SSL encryption, or accepts both HTTP and HTTPS requests.

Figure 162: HTTP Control > Connections> SSL Settings — Enabling SSL encryption in HTTP

Steps:
  1. In SSL Settings, select Permit HTTPS traffic. To control plain HTTP traffic with the same connection policy, enable Allow HTTP traffic.

  2. Select the certificate to show to the clients.

    • To use the same certificate for every session, select Use the same certificate for each connection.

      NOTE:

      When using the Use the same certificate for each connection option and the connection policy allows access to multiple servers using HTTPS, the client browsers will display a warning because the certificate used in the connection will be invalid: the Common Name of the certificate will not match the hostname or IP address of the server.

    • To use a separate certificate for every session, complete the following steps.

      1. Create a certificate authority that will be used to sign the certificates that SPS shows to the server. For details, see Signing certificates on-the-fly.

      2. Select Bridge certificate. In this case, SPS performs certificate bridging, that is, copies the data from the server's certificate into a new one, issued by the selected Certificate Authority.

        NOTE:

        Bridge certificate option does not work the same way as the Generate certificate on-the-fly option in other protocol settings.

      3. In the Signing CA field, select the certificate authority to use.

        NOTE:

        Import the certificate of the signing Certificate Authority to your clients. Otherwise, the client browsers will display a warning because of the unknown Certificate Authority.

  3. Select how SPS should authenticate the server.

    • To permit connections to servers without requesting a certificate, select No validation.

    • To permit connections only to servers having valid certificate that was signed by a specific CA, complete the following steps.

      1. Create a list of trusted Certificate Authorities that will be used to validate the certificates of the servers. For details on creating a trusted CA list, see Verifying certificates with Certificate Authorities.

      2. Select Only accept certificates authenticated by the trusted CA list.

      3. In the Trusted CA field, select the certificate authority list to use.

Configuring half-sided SSL encryption in HTTP

Purpose:

To enable half-sided SSL encryption, require HTTPS on client side, and HTTP on server side perform the following steps.

Figure 163: HTTP Control > Connections> SSL Settings — Enabling half-sided SSL encryption in HTTP

Limitations:

The Server Name Indication (SNI) extension of SSL and TLS is only supported by appropriate client OS and browser combinations. For details on the limitations, see Browsers with support for TLS server name indication. There are several unsupported scenarios, for example Windows XP + any version of Internet Explorer, Ubuntu Lucid + certain versions of Mozilla Firefox. When the client does not support SNI, the CN will contain the target IP, and the client browsers will display a warning when accessing these servers.

NOTE:

When Generate certificate on-the-fly is selected, and the connection is in transparent setup, the CN field is filled in using SNI (Server Name Indication). When the client does not support SNI, the CN will contain the target IP, which may cause certificate verification warning on the client browser.

Steps:
  1. In SSL Settings, select Require HTTPS on client side and HTTP on server side.

    NOTE:

    If the connection is configured at Target to Use fixed address and the port number is set to 443, SPS will still automatically use port 80 to connect to the server, when Require HTTPS on client side and HTTP on server side is selected.

  2. To use a fix certificate, select Use the same certificate for each connection and copy or upload the certificate.

    One Identity recommends using 2048-bit RSA keys (or stronger).

  3. To generate a certificate on-the-fly, signed by a provided Signing CA, select Generate certificate on-the-fly. It uses the parameters of the signing CA, excluding the CN field, which is filled with the name of the target host name.

    NOTE:

    When Generate certificate on-the-fly is selected, and the connection is in transparent setup, the CN field is filled in using SNI (Server Name Indication). When the client does not support SNI, the CN will contain the target IP, which may cause certificate verification warning on the client browser.

Session-handling in HTTP

Communication over HTTP consists of client requests and server responses (also called exchanges). Unlike in other protocols, for example SSH, these request-response pairs do not form a well-defined, continuous connection. Therefore, SPS assumes that an HTTP request-response pair belongs to a specific session if the following points are true:

  • The IP address of the client is the same

  • The hostname of the target server (not the IP address) is the same

  • The username is the same (if the user has performed inband authentication)

  • The time elapsed since the last request-response pair between the same client and server is less then the session timeout value (15 minutes by default).

SPS creates a separate audit trail and records the accessed URLs for every session. These are displayed on the Search > Search page. If any of the columns is not visible, click Customize columns....

For technical reasons, in authenticated sessions the login page where the user provides the credentials is not part of the session associated with the username. This means that even if the login page is the first that the user visits, SPS will record two sessions: the first does not include a username, the second one does. These two sessions are visible on the Active Connections page (until the unauthenticated session times out).

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