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One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions 5.9.0 - Administration Guide

Preface Introduction The concepts of SPS The Welcome Wizard and the first login Basic settings User management and access control Managing SPS
Controlling SPS: reboot, shutdown Managing Safeguard for Privileged Sessions clusters Managing a high availability SPS cluster Upgrading SPS Managing the SPS license Accessing the SPS console Sealed mode Out-of-band management of SPS Managing the certificates used on SPS
General connection settings HTTP-specific settings ICA-specific settings RDP-specific settings SSH-specific settings Telnet-specific settings VMware Horizon View connections VNC-specific settings Indexing audit trails Using the Search (classic) interface Using the Search interface Searching session data on a central node in a cluster Advanced authentication and authorization techniques Reports The SPS RPC API The SPS REST API SPS scenarios Troubleshooting SPS Configuring external devices Using SCP with agent-forwarding Security checklist for configuring SPS Jumplists for in-product help Third-party contributions About us

Changing log verbosity level of SPS

Purpose:

The logging level of SPS can be set separately for every protocol. To change the verbosity level of SPS, complete the following steps:

NOTE:

The Basic Settings > Management > Verbose system logs > Enable option is not related to the verbosity of traffic logs: it increases the log level of the non-network-related events, for example adds the commands executed by the SPS web interface to the logs, and so on.

Figure 279: <Protocol name> Control > Global Options — Changing the verbosity level

Steps:
  1. Navigate to the Global Options page of the traffic you want to change the log level of, for example, to SSH Control > Global Options to change the log level of SSH traffic, RDP Control > Global Options for remote desktop traffic, and so on.

  2. Select the desired log level from the Verbosity level field.

    NOTE:

    The verbosity level ranges from 1 (no logging) to 10 (extremely detailed), with level 4 being the default normal level. To debug complex problems, you might have to increase the verbosity level to 6. Higher level is needed only in extreme cases.

    Caution:

    High verbosity levels generate very large amount of log messages and might result in a very high load on the machine.

    Around log levels 9-10, the logs can contain highly sensitive data, for example, passwords in plain text format.

Collecting logs and system information for error reporting

Purpose:

To track down support requests, the One Identity Support Team might request you to collect system-state and debugging information. This information is collected automatically, and contains log files, the configuration file of SPS, and various system-statistics.

NOTE:

Sensitive data like key files and passwords are automatically removed from the files, that is, configuration files do not contain passwords or keys. However, if you increase the proxy verbosity level to 8-10 in the Global Options, then for troubleshooting purposes, the logs can contain highly sensitive data, for example, passwords and keys in plain text format. If you are concerned about the presence of sensitive data, check the collected log files before submitting to the Support Portal.

The Basic Settings > Management > Verbose system logs > Enable option is not related to the verbosity of log messages: it adds the commands executed by the SPS web interface to the log.

To collect system-state information (also known as a support bundle), navigate to Basic Settings > Troubleshooting > Create support bundle and click Create support bundle, then save the created zip file. The name of the file uses the debug_info-<hostname>YYYYMMDDHHMM format.

To collect information for a specific error, complete the following steps:

Steps:
  1. Navigate to Basic Settings > Troubleshooting > Create support bundle.

    Figure 280: Basic Settings > Troubleshooting > Create support bundle — Collecting debug information

  2. Click Start.

    NOTE:

    Starting a full debug logging increases the log level of SPS, and might cause performance problems if the system is under a high load.

    For troubleshooting purposes, the logs can contain highly sensitive data, for example, passwords and keys in plain text format. If you are concerned about the presence of sensitive data, check the collected log files before submitting to the Support Portal.

  3. Reproduce the event that causes the error, for example connect to a server.

  4. Click Stop.

  5. Click Save support bundle with full debug logs and save the created zip file. The name of the file uses the debug_info-<hostname>YYYYMMDDHHMM format.

    SPS includes the configuration files of any plugins installed. Note that depending on the plugin, these configuration files can contain sensitive information, such as passwords or API keys. In this case, edit the plugin-related files in the plugins directory of the support bundle and delete the sensitive information.

  6. Attach the file to your support ticket.

Status history and statistics

SPS displays various statistics and status history of system data and performance on the dashboard at Basic Settings > Dashboard. The dashboard is essentially an extension of the system monitor: the system monitor displays only the current values, while the dashboard creates graphs and statistics of the system parameters.

The dashboard consists of different modules. Every module displays the history of a system parameter for the current day. To display the graph for a longer period (last week, last month, or last year), select the Week, Month, or Year options, respectively. Hovering the mouse over a module enlarges the graph and displays the color code used on the graph.

All types of data is collected every five minutes. This means that if changes are more frequent, it might not be represented in the graphs.

NOTE:

If all parameters displayed are 0 at a certain point in time, it might mean that at that time SPS was not functional (for example, turned off or unresponsive). Or, in certain cases it might also mean that there was no information at that time.

NOTE:

If you want to compare data displayed on the Dashboard to data displayed on the System Monitor, they might be different, because data on System Monitor is based on SNMP values, whereas data on the related Dashboard modules are based on the output of different commands.

To display statistics of a module as a table for the selected period, click on the graph.

Figure 281: Basic Settings > Dashboard — The dashboard

The following modules are displayed on the dashboard of SPS:

  • Connection statistics: Number of active connections per protocol.

  • Memory: The memory used by the system.

  • Disk: Filesystem usage for the different partitions.

  • CPU: CPU usage.

  • Network connections: Number of network connections.

  • Physical interface 1 (eth0): Traffic on physical interface 1.

  • Physical interface 2 (eth1): Traffic on physical interface 2.

  • Physical interface 3 (eth2): Traffic on physical interface 3.

  • Load average: Average load of the system.

  • Number of processes: The number of running processes.

Connection statistics

Figure 282: Basic Settings > Dashboard > Connection statistics

The Connection statistics module on the Dashboard is based on statistics of high-level proxy-service protocols (SSH, RDP, VNC, ICA, and so on). These numbers display all active high-level proxy-service protocols, but these numbers are counted by all service connections too, which are connected to some protocols. Because of this, these numbers can differ from the numbers displayed on the Active Connections page.

For example, if there are several active ICA connections in your system, it means that there are approximately the same number of CGP connections that are opened and counted in the Connection statistics module under the ICA label. If these CGP or ICA high-level proxy-service protocols are opening more than one TCP connections, these connections will be counted in the Network connetion module as different TCP connections, but these will count as only one connection on the Active Connections page.

Statistics:

The connection types displayed can be the following:

  • RDP: The number of RDP connections.

  • SSH:The number of SSH connections.

  • HTTP: The number of HTTP connections.

  • ICA: The number of Citrix connections.

  • Telnet: The number of Telnet connections.

  • VNC: The number of VNC connections.

The Min, Average and Max values are displayed as a whole number if the value is constant for the statistics interval (the statistics are stored every 5 minutes). If minor changes occur in the actual values (for example, new connections are established), these changes can be displayed as fractions.

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