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One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions 6.1.0 - Administration Guide

Preface Introduction The concepts of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) The Welcome Wizard and the first login Basic settings
Supported web browsers and operating systems The structure of the web interface Network settings Configuring date and time System logging, SNMP and e-mail alerts Configuring system monitoring on SPS Data and configuration backups Archiving and cleanup Forwarding data to third-party systems Joining to One Identity Starling
User management and access control Managing One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
Controlling One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS): reboot, shutdown Managing Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) clusters Managing a High Availability One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) cluster Upgrading One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Managing the One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) license Accessing the One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) console Sealed mode Out-of-band management of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Managing the certificates used on One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
General connection settings HTTP-specific settings ICA-specific settings RDP-specific settings SSH-specific settings Telnet-specific settings VMware Horizon View connections VNC-specific settings Indexing audit trails Using the Search interface Advanced authentication and authorization techniques Reports The One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) RPC API The One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) REST API One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) scenarios Troubleshooting One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Configuring external devices Using SCP with agent-forwarding Security checklist for configuring One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Jumplists for in-product help LDAP user and group resolution in SPS Appendix: Deprecated features

Enabling TLS encryption in HTTP

This setting either enforces TLS encryption or accepts both HTTP and HTTPS requests.

Figure 167: HTTP Control > Connections> SSL Settings — Enabling SSL encryption in HTTP

To enable SSL encryption

  1. In SSL Settings, select Permit HTTPS traffic. To control plain HTTP traffic with the same connection policy, enable Allow HTTP traffic.

  2. Select the certificate to show to the clients.

    • To use the same certificate for every peer, complete the following steps.

      1. Generate and sign a certificate for One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) in your PKI system, then export the certificate and its private key.

      2. Select Use the same certificate for each connection.

      3. Select Private key for host certificate, click and upload the private key.

      4. Select X.509 host certificate, click and upload the certificate.

    NOTE:

    When using the Use the same certificate for each connection option and the connection policy that allows access to multiple servers using HTTPS, the client browsers will display a warning because the certificate used in the connection will be invalid (namely, the Common Name of the certificate will not match the hostname or IP address of the server).

    • To use a separate certificate for every connection, complete the following steps.

      1. Create a certificate authority that will be used to sign the certificates that SPS shows to the peer. For details, see Signing certificates on-the-fly.

      2. Select Generate certificate on-the-fly.

      3. Select the certificate authority to use in the Signing CA field.

    Limitations

    NOTE:

    When Generate certificate on-the-fly is selected and the connection is in transparent setup, the CN field is filled in using Server Name Indication (SNI). If the client does not support SNI, the CN field will contain the target IP, which may cause certificate verification warning on the client browser.

    NOTE:

    Import the certificate of the signing Certificate Authority to your clients. Otherwise, the client browsers will display a warning due to the unknown Certificate Authority.

  3. Select how SPS should authenticate the server.

    • To permit connections to servers without requesting a certificate, select No validation.

    • To permit connections only to servers with a valid certificate that was signed by a specific CA, complete the following steps.

      1. Create a list of trusted Certificate Authorities that will be used to validate the certificates of the servers. For details on creating a trusted CA list, see Verifying certificates with Certificate Authorities.

      2. Select Only accept certificates authenticated by the trusted CA list.

      3. In the Trusted CA field, select the certificate authority list to use.

Configuring half-sided SSL encryption in HTTP

The following steps describe how to enable half-sided SSL encryption (which requires HTTPS on client side, and HTTP on server side).

Figure 168: HTTP Control > Connections > SSL Settings — Enabling half-sided TLS encryption in HTTP

To enable half-sided TLS encryption, require HTTPS on client side, and HTTP on server side

  1. In SSL Settings, select Require HTTPS on client side and HTTP on server side.

    NOTE:

    If the connection is configured at Target to Use fixed address and the port number is set to 443, One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) will still automatically use port 80 to connect to the server, when Require HTTPS on client side and HTTP on server side is selected.

  2. Select the certificate to show to the clients.

    • To use the same certificate for every peer, complete the following steps.

      1. Generate and sign a certificate for SPS in your PKI system, and export the certificate and its private key.

      2. Select Use the same certificate for each connection.

      3. Select Private key for host certificate, click and upload the private key.

      4. Select X.509 host certificate, click and upload the certificate.

      NOTE:

      When using the Use the same certificate for each connection option and the connection policy that allows access to multiple servers using HTTPS, the client browsers will display a warning because the certificate used in the connection will be invalid (namely, the Common Name of the certificate will not match the hostname or IP address of the server).

    • To use a separate certificate for every connection, complete the following steps.

      1. Create a certificate authority that will be used to sign the certificates that SPS shows to the peer. For details, see Signing certificates on-the-fly.

      2. Select Generate certificate on-the-fly.

      3. Select the certificate authority to use in the Signing CA field.

    Limitations

    NOTE:

    When Generate certificate on-the-fly is selected and the connection is in transparent setup, the CN field is filled in using Server Name Indication (SNI). If the client does not support SNI, the CN field will contain the target IP, which may cause certificate verification warning on the client browser.

    NOTE:

    Import the certificate of the signing Certificate Authority to your clients. Otherwise, the client browsers will display a warning due to the unknown Certificate Authority.

Session-handling in HTTP

Communication over HTTP consists of client requests and server responses (also called exchanges). Unlike in other protocols, for example SSH, these request-response pairs do not form a well-defined, continuous connection. Therefore, One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) assumes that an HTTP request-response pair belongs to a specific session if the following points are true:

  • The IP address of the client is the same

  • The hostname of the target server (not the IP address) is the same

  • The username is the same (if the user has performed inband authentication)

  • The time elapsed since the last request-response pair between the same client and server is less then the session timeout value (15 minutes by default).

  • The first session cookie SPS finds within the request is the same. Note that the cookie must be listed in the Session Cookie Settings option. For details, see Creating and editing protocol-level HTTP settings.

SPS creates a separate audit trail and records the accessed URLs for every session. These are displayed on the Search page. If any of the columns is not visible, click Customize columns....

For technical reasons, in authenticated sessions the login page where the user provides the credentials is not part of the session associated with the username. This means that even if the login page is the first that the user visits, SPS will record two sessions: the first does not include a username, the second one does. These two sessions are visible on the Active Connections page (until the unauthenticated session times out).

Creating and editing protocol-level HTTP settings

HTTP settings determine the parameters of the connection on the protocol level, including timeout value, and so on.

Caution:

Modifying timeout settings is recommended only to advanced users. Do not modify these settings unless you exactly know what you are doing.

To create a new HTTP settings profile or edit an existing one

  1. Navigate to the Settings tab of the HTTP Control menu item and click to create a HTTP setting profile. Enter a name for the profile (for example http_special).

    Figure 169: HTTP Control > Settings — Creating and editing protocol-level HTTP settings

  2. Click to display the parameters of the profile.

  3. Modify the parameters as needed. The following parameters are available:

    • Idle timeout: Timeout value for the session in seconds. To avoid early timeout, set it to a larger value, for example a week (604800 seconds).

      Caution:

      Determining if a connection is idle is based on the network traffic generated by the connection, not the activity of the user. For example, if an application or the taskbar of a graphical desktop displays the time which is updated every minute, it generates network traffic every minute, negating the effects of timeout values greater than one minute and preventing One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) from closing the connection.

    • Session timeout: Timeout value for the session in seconds.

    • Enable pre channel check: Select this option to evaluate the connection and channel policies before establishing the server-side connection. That way if the connection is not permitted at all, SPS does not establish the server-side connection.

      NOTE:

      This option cannot be disabled.

  4. To distinguish the audited HTTP requests and responses based on the session cookies of web applications, click Session Cookie Settings > , and enter the name of the session cookie, for example, PHPSESSID, JSESSIONID, or ASP.NET_SessionId. Note that the names of session cookies are case sensitive.

    Repeat this step to add multiple cookie names. Note that if you list multiple cookie names, SPS will use the first one it finds to assign the requests to a session.

  5. To configure TLS security settings on both the Client side and the Server side, proceed to TLS security settings.

    Figure 170: <Protocol> Control > Settings > TLS security settings - configuring TLS security settings

    • Cipher strength specifies the cipher string OpenSSL will use. The following settings options are possible:

      • Recommended: this setting only uses ciphers with adequate security level.

      • Custom: this setting allows you to specify the list of ciphers you want to permit SPS to use in the connection. This setting is only recommended in order to ensure compatibility with older systems. For more details on customizing this list, check the 'openssl-ciphers' manual page on your SPS appliance.

    • Minimum TLS version specifies the minimal TLS version SPS will offer during negotiation. The following settings options are possible:

      • TLS 1.2: this setting will only offer TLS version 1.2 during negotiation. This is the recommended setting.

      • TLS 1.1: this setting will offer TLS version 1.1 and later versions during negotiation.

      • TLS 1.0: this setting will offer TLS version 1.0 and later versions during negotiation.

    NOTE:

    Note that SPS only permits TLS-encrypted connections. SSLv3 is not supported.

  6. Click Commit.

  7. Select this settings profile in the HTTP settings field of your connections.

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