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One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions 6.1.0 - Administration Guide

Preface Introduction The concepts of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) The Welcome Wizard and the first login Basic settings
Supported web browsers and operating systems The structure of the web interface Network settings Configuring date and time System logging, SNMP and e-mail alerts Configuring system monitoring on SPS Data and configuration backups Archiving and cleanup Forwarding data to third-party systems Joining to One Identity Starling
User management and access control Managing One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
Controlling One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS): reboot, shutdown Managing Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) clusters Managing a High Availability One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) cluster Upgrading One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Managing the One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) license Accessing the One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) console Sealed mode Out-of-band management of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Managing the certificates used on One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
General connection settings HTTP-specific settings ICA-specific settings RDP-specific settings SSH-specific settings Telnet-specific settings VMware Horizon View connections VNC-specific settings Indexing audit trails Using the Search interface Advanced authentication and authorization techniques Reports The One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) RPC API The One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) REST API One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) scenarios Troubleshooting One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Configuring external devices Using SCP with agent-forwarding Security checklist for configuring One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Jumplists for in-product help LDAP user and group resolution in SPS Appendix: Deprecated features

Integrating ticketing systems

The plugin framework provided by One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) can also be used to integrate SPS to external ticketing (or issue tracking) systems, allowing you to request a ticket ID from the user before authenticating on the target server. That way, SPS can verify that the user has a valid reason to access the server — and optionally terminate the connection if he does not. Requesting a ticket ID currently supports the following protocols:

  • Remote Desktop (RDP)

  • Secure Shell (SSH)

  • TELNET

  • TN3270

Topics:

Performing authentication with ticketing integration in terminal connections

The following describes how to establish a terminal connection (SSH, TELNET, or TN3270) to a server that requires you to enter a ticket ID.

To establish a terminal connection (SSH, TELNET, or TN3270) to a server that requires you to enter a ticket ID

  1. Connect to the server.

    You have the option to use the ID of the ticket you are working on as part of the username (replace id with the ticket ID):

    ssh ticket_id=id@user@server

    NOTE:

    Your plugin may use a different name for the key ticket_id shown in the example. Plugins work with key-value pairs and the names of keys are entirely up to individual plugins.

  2. If you did not provide a ticket ID, One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) now prompts you to enter it.

  3. Authenticate on the server.

  4. If the authentication is successful, you can access the server.

Performing authentication with ticketing integration in Remote Desktop connections

The following describes how to establish a Remote Desktop (RDP) connection to a server that requires you to enter a ticket ID.

To establish an RDP connection to a server that requires you to enter a ticket ID

  1. Open your Remote Desktop client application.

  2. Enter the ticket ID into your Remote Desktop client application into the User name field, before or after the regular content (for example, your username) of the field. You must provide the ticket ID in the following format:

    ticket_id~<your-ticket-id>%

    Replace <your-ticket-id> with your actual ticket number. For example:

    ticket_id~12345%Administrator

    NOTE:

    Your plugin may use a different name for the key ticket_id shown in the example. Plugins work with key-value pairs and the names of keys are entirely up to individual plugins.

    To encode additional data, you can use the following special characters:

    • % as a field separator

    • ~ as the equal sign

    • ^ as a colon (for example, to specify the port number or an IPv6 IP address)

    For example, to add a token ID before your username, use the following format:

    domain\token_id~12345%Administrator

    Note how domain information is provided. If your server is in a domain, make sure that you specify the domain in this format: putting it in front, followed by a backslash (\).

  3. Connect to the server.

  4. Authenticate on the server.

  5. If the authentication is successful, you can access the server.

Creating a custom plugin

Creating a custom Authentication and Authorization plugin

For more information, see Creating custom Authentication and Authorization plugins.

Creating a custom Credential Store plugin

For more information, see Creating custom Credential Store plugins.

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