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One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions 6.11.1 - Administration Guide

Preface Introduction The concepts of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
The philosophy of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Policies Credential Stores Plugin framework Indexing Supported protocols and client applications Modes of operation Connecting to a server through One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Archive and backup concepts Maximizing the scope of auditing IPv6 in One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) SSH host keys Authenticating clients using public-key authentication in SSH The gateway authentication process Four-eyes authorization Network interfaces High Availability support in One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Versions and releases of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Accessing and configuring One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
Cloud deployment considerations The Welcome Wizard and the first login Basic settings
Supported web browsers and operating systems The structure of the web interface Network settings Configuring date and time System logging, SNMP and e-mail alerts Configuring system monitoring on SPS Data and configuration backups Archiving and cleanup Using plugins Forwarding data to third-party systems Starling integration
User management and access control Managing One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
Controlling One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS): reboot, shutdown Managing Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) clusters Managing a High Availability One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) cluster Upgrading One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Managing the One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) license Accessing the One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) console Sealed mode Out-of-band management of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Managing the certificates used on One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
General connection settings HTTP-specific settings ICA-specific settings MSSQL-specific settings RDP-specific settings SSH-specific settings Using Sudo with SPS Telnet-specific settings VMware Horizon View connections VNC-specific settings Indexing audit trails Using the Search interface Advanced authentication and authorization techniques Reports The One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) REST API One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) scenarios Troubleshooting One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Using SPS with SPP Configuring external devices Using SCP with agent-forwarding Security checklist for configuring One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Jumplists for in-product help Configuring SPS to use an LDAP backend Glossary

Contents of PCI DSS reports

To help you comply with the regulations of the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS), One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) can generate reports on the compliance status of SPS. Note that this is not a fully-featured compliance report: it is a tool to enhance and complement your compliance report by providing information available in SPS. The report corresponds with the document Payment Card Industry (PCI) Data Security Standard, Requirements and Security Assessment Procedures, Version 3.0, published by the PCI Security Standards Council.

For details on creating PCI DSS reports, see Creating PCI DSS reports. The following table details the information included in the SPS PCI DSS reports, and the relevant PCI compliance requirement.

Table 29: Contents of PCI DSS reports
PCI DSS Requirement Compliance details
Requirement 1.1.6

Documentation and business justification for use of all services, protocols, and ports allowed, including documentation of security features implemented for those protocols considered to be insecure. Examples of insecure services, protocols, or ports include but are not limited to FTP, Telnet, POP3, IMAP, and SNMP v1 and v2.

The report lists the insecure connection policies configured in SPS, including SNMP server and agent settings, and the list of connection policies that permit unencrypted HTTP and Telnet. This list does not include any insecure connections that can be used to access SPS itself.
Requirement 2.1

Always change vendor-supplied defaults and remove or disable unnecessary default accounts before installing a system on the network. This applies to ALL default passwords, including but not limited to those used by operating systems, software that provides security services, application and system accounts, point-of-sale (POS) terminals, Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP)community strings, etc.).

SPS can be accessed as "root" via the local management console, or - if explicitly enabled - remotely using a Secure Shell (SSH v2) connection. The report lists the local web user accounts that can access SPS. For details on configuring these accounts, see Managing One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) users locally.
Requirement 2.2.2

Enable only necessary services, protocols, daemons, etc., as required for the function of the system.

The report includes the list of services running on SPS.
Requirement 2.2.3

Implement additional security features for any required services, protocols, or daemons that are considered to be insecure, for example, use secured technologies such as SSH, S-FTP, SSL, or IPSec VPN to protect insecure services such as NetBIOS, file-sharing, Telnet, FTP, etc.

The report lists the connection policies enabling unencrypted HTTP and Telnet access, and any such session that was active when the report was generated.
Requirement 2.3

Encrypt all non-console administrative access using strong cryptography. Use technologies such as SSH, VPN, or SSL/TLS for web-based management and other non-console administrative access.

Use HTTPS to connect to SPS. HTTP connections are forbidden.
Requirement 3.5.2

Store secret and private keys used to encrypt/decrypt cardholder data in one (or more) of the following forms at all times:

  • Encrypted with a key-encrypting key that is at least as strong as the dataencrypting key, and that is stored separately from the data-encrypting key

  • Within a secure cryptographic device (such as a host security module (HSM) or PTS-approved point-of-interaction device)

  • As at least two full-length key components or key shares, in accordance with an industry-accepted method

Note: It is not required that public keys be stored in one of these forms.

Audit trails are encrypted with AES128-GCM (audit trails recorded with SPS 5 F3 and earlier are encrypted with AES128-CBC). The master key is encrypted with the key you provided.
Requirement 5.1.2

For systems considered to be not commonly affected by malicious software, perform periodic evaluations to identify and evaluate evolving malware threats in order to confirm whether such systems continue to not require anti-virus software.

SPS is an appliance running minimal services and using a hardened operating system. One Identity, the vendor of SPS, continuously monitors vulnerabilities and CVEs that might affect the components of SPS, and publishes security updates and announcements as needed. Using an up-to-date SPS version should keep the risk of SPS being affected by malicious software at a minimum level.
Requirement 6.2

Ensure that all system components and software are protected from known vulnerabilities by installing applicable vendor-supplied security patches. Install critical security patches within one month of release.

The report includes the firmware version running on SPS. You can check which is the latest version at the Downloads page.
Requirement 8.1.8

If a session has been idle for more than 15 minutes, require the user to reauthenticate to re-activate the terminal or session.

The report includes the timeout value to the SPS web interface (10 minutes by default). To change this value, see Web interface timeout.
Requirement 8.2.1

Using strong cryptography, render all authentication credentials (such as passwords/phrases) unreadable during transmission and storage on all system components.

The report lists where SPS stores passwords, and the hash used to secure them.
Requirement 8.2.4

Change user passwords/passphrases at least every 90 days.

The report lists the password expiry settings of local web users of SPS, and also the last time the password of each user was changed. For details on configuring these accounts, see Managing One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) users locally. For details on configuring password expiry for these accounts, see Setting password policies for local users.
Requirement 8.2.5

Do not allow an individual to submit a new password/phrase that is the same as any of the last four passwords/phrases he or she has used.

The report includes the password history settings of local web users of SPS. For details on configuring password history for these accounts, see Setting password policies for local users.
Requirement 10.5.3

Promptly back up audit trail files to a centralized log server or media that is difficult to alter.

The report lists the addresses of the logservers where SPS forwards its log messages. For details on forwarding log messages, see Configuring system logging.
Requirement 10.5.4

Write logs for external-facing technologies onto a secure, centralized, internal log server or media device.

The report lists the security settings of the communication between SPS and the logservers where SPS forwards its log messages. For details on forwarding log messages, see Configuring system logging.
Requirement 10.7

Retain audit trail history for at least one year, with a minimum of three months immediately available for analysis.

The retention time for local logs of SPS is seven days. To retain them longer, forward them to a remote logserver.

Report output

The output of the reports are available in PDF format.

The reports enable you to check the sessions that contain the configured search expressions. For security reasons, the relevant sessions are available through links to avoid including the session details directly in the report. You can open the related sessions using one of the following methods:

  • Clicking the link in the Sessions key column of the table
  • Clicking the QR code
  • Clicking the link provided with the QR code
Searching by sessions keys

From the report, you can access the relevant sessions on the Search interface by clicking the link in the Sessions key column.

NOTE: If clicking on the sessions key does not work, for example, because the IP address of your SPS has changed, you can still use the key to access the relevant session as follows:

  1. Copy the key from the Sessions key column, for example, svc-uXG6ciAkstSanfD8YhGHXVddavid-7 as shown in the following example.
  2. Create a link, using the IP address of your SPS and the sessions key in the following format: 

    https://<your-SPS-IP>/portal/#/audit/sessions/<sessions-key>

    For example, if using the following example and an SPS with an IP address of 10.10.10.10, the link is https://10.10.10.10/portal/#/audit/sessions/svc-uXG6ciAkstSanfD8YhGHXV-ddavid-7

Figure 344: Reporting > Download reports — Accessing sessions from the PDF output

Accessing screenshots from the report output using QR codes

NOTE: The screenshots of the sessions containing the search keywords are not included in the report output for security reasons, but you can access the screenshots by using the clickable QR codes.

Alternatively, you can click the link provided with the QR codes, which makes it possible to display the link text if the report is printed on paper.

Figure 345: Example of a clickable QR code in the report output

The One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) REST API

Starting with One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) version 4 F2, certain parts and features of SPS can be configured using a REST API (Representational State Transfer Application Programming Interface). The REST server conforms to the Hypermedia as the Engine of Application State (HATEOAS).

The SPS REST API uses JSON over HTTPS. The REST server has a single entry point and all resources are available at paths (URLs) returned in the response for a request sent to the entry point. The only path that is guaranteed not to change is /api/authentication. Every other path should be reached by navigating the links returned.

The SPS REST API allows you to create, read, update and delete (CRUD) the configuration resources of SPS.

The user accessing the SPS REST API must have the REST server privilege. For details, see "Modifying group privileges" in the Administration Guide. For details on using the REST API, see REST API Reference Guide.

One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) scenarios

This section discusses common scenarios for One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS).

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