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One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions 6.11.1 - Administration Guide

Preface Introduction The concepts of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
The philosophy of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Policies Credential Stores Plugin framework Indexing Supported protocols and client applications Modes of operation Connecting to a server through One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Archive and backup concepts Maximizing the scope of auditing IPv6 in One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) SSH host keys Authenticating clients using public-key authentication in SSH The gateway authentication process Four-eyes authorization Network interfaces High Availability support in One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Versions and releases of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Accessing and configuring One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
Cloud deployment considerations The Welcome Wizard and the first login Basic settings
Supported web browsers and operating systems The structure of the web interface Network settings Configuring date and time System logging, SNMP and e-mail alerts Configuring system monitoring on SPS Data and configuration backups Archiving and cleanup Using plugins Forwarding data to third-party systems Starling integration
User management and access control Managing One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
Controlling One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS): reboot, shutdown Managing Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) clusters Managing a High Availability One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) cluster Upgrading One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Managing the One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) license Accessing the One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) console Sealed mode Out-of-band management of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Managing the certificates used on One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
General connection settings HTTP-specific settings ICA-specific settings MSSQL-specific settings RDP-specific settings SSH-specific settings Using Sudo with SPS Telnet-specific settings VMware Horizon View connections VNC-specific settings Indexing audit trails Using the Search interface Advanced authentication and authorization techniques Reports The One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) REST API One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) scenarios Troubleshooting One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Using SPS with SPP Configuring external devices Using SCP with agent-forwarding Security checklist for configuring One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Jumplists for in-product help Configuring SPS to use an LDAP backend Glossary

Visualizing Frequent Item Sets on the FIS flow view

This section provides an overview of the Frequent Item Sets (FIS) flow view feature on the Search interface. It describes the underlying component (that is, the FIS algorithm), the elements of the FIS flow view visual, and possible scenarios (depending on your session details and pattern option choice).

From One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) version 6.2., a visual overview of Frequent Item Set (FIS) analysis is available on the Search interface. The FIS flow view is essentially similar to the flow view analytics overview, except that the FIS flow view only displays data narrowed down to a single user's previous sessions in the analysis period (which is the previous 90 days by default).

The component behind the analysis is the FIS algorithm, which examines multiple attributes of sessions and attempts to find values that frequently appear together, forming a set. Using this information, the algorithm can discover patterns in user behavior.

NOTE: For the FIS algorithm to be able to score a user's sessions, the user needs at least 1 FIS baseline built. Algorithm baselines (including the FIS baselines) are built automatically every day (usually during hours with less heavy traffic).

Elements of the FIS flow view

To access the FIS flow view feature, click on of the session of your choice in Search > Sessions list, then click Analytics.

Figure 292: Search — The FIS flow view on the Analytics tab

Figure 293: Search — The FIS flow view (close-up)

The layout of the FIS flow view is similar to the attributes-grouped flow view, with the sessions forming a flow line (from here on referred to as a Connection). The relevant examined attributes (including the attribute nodes) are visible on the left hand side, while the irrelevant attributes (including the attribute nodes) are on the right hand side of the flow line visual.

The continuous line, with circles representing attribute nodes (that can be gray ( ) or contain the or the mark), displays the current session. Each attribute node represents that particular attribute's value in the current session. The FIS algorithm attempts to match these attribute values to the patterns in the user's baseline.

The different attribute node markings stand for:

: session data for this attribute is irrelevant for pattern match comparison (or session data is part of the Default option)

: session data for this attribute is a match for the selected pattern

: session data for this attribute is not a match for the selected pattern

Attributes

Similarly to the flow view, session data in the FIS flow view is grouped according to attributes (such as Protocol, Client name, Server hostname, Server port, and so on) that come from session data. The two attributes in the FIS flow view that do not come from session data as-is, but are further grouped instead:

  • Bucketed starting hour: the most frequently used session starting hours grouped into intervals of 3 hours each

  • Bucketed duration: the most frequently occurring session duration values, grouped into intervals of various length

NOTE: As a rule, the relevant attributes and attribute nodes (marked with or ) are located on the left hand side of the flow line visual, while the irrelevant attribute nodes (marked with ) are located on the right hand side of the flow line visual. The number of relevant attributes for the pattern match comparison, as well as the attribute groups' (and, as a result, the attribute nodes') relative position and relative order (going from left to right) changes from pattern to pattern on the flow line visual.

The FIS score gauge

The FIS score gauge (located in the upper right corner of the FIS flow view visual) indicates the FIS score of the selected session.

Figure 294: Search — The FIS score gauge

The FIS score is assigned to the session after the FIS algorithm analyzes it in comparison with the latest available baseline. If the session has a high amount of matches to the user's baseline, the FIS score's value will be low (indicating normal user behavior).

NOTE: The closer the FIS score gets to 100, the more it indicates unusual user behavior. For more information about normal and unusual user behavior, see Analyzing data using One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Analytics, Viewing session details, and the View session analytics step in Analyzing data using One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Analytics.

The value of the FIS score (also visible on the Search > Sessions list, as well as in the aggregated score summary, usually above the FIS flow line visual) is one of the several components of the session's aggregated score.

Figure 295: Search — The FIS score visible on Search > Sessions list

For more information about analytics algorithms and scores, see this section.

Pattern selection drop-down list

The pattern selection drop-down list (by default set to the Default option) offers the available patterns that the FIS algorithm generates after baseline analysis.

Figure 296: Search — The pattern selection drop-down list (set to the Default option)

Figure 297: Search — The pattern selection drop-down list (further options)

Depending on which available pattern option you select, the visual will display one of these cases:

  • The Default option

    The Default option is the set of values that the FIS algorithm takes as a reference point. If you select the Default option, the flow line visual displays the user's previous sessions in the observed analysis period, with no patterns selected yet. The flow line visual below (set to the Default option) displays all possible attributes, marked with in all attributes.

    Figure 298: Search — FIS flow view - the Default option (no patterns displayed yet)

  • Pattern with a 100% match to this user's sessions during the observed analysis period

    The example below displays a pattern that appears in 100% of the user's previous sessions during the analysis period. As mentioned before, the relevant attribute nodes (marked with the or the sign, depending on whether that attribute value matches or does not match the Default option in that particular session) are arranged on the left-hand side, while the irrelevant ones (marked with ) are arranged on the right-hand side of the flow line visual. There are 3 attribute matches (namely, Protocol, Recording Connection policy, and Server port) to this particular pattern in this particular session.

    Figure 299: Search — FIS flow view - a pattern with a 100% match

  • Pattern with a high match percentage to this user's sessions during the observed analysis period

    The example below displays a pattern that appears in 92% of the user's previous sessions during the observed analysis period. Similarly to the previous example, the relevant attribute nodes are arranged on the left-hand side, while the irrelevant ones are arranged on the right-hand side of the flow line visual. This example contains different relevant attribute nodes than the previous example, with 4 attribute matches to this particular pattern in this particular session.

    Figure 300: Search — FIS flow view - a pattern with a high match percentage

  • Pattern with a low match percentage to this user's sessions during the observed analysis period

    The example below displays a pattern with a low match percentage, appearing in only 12% of this user's previous sessions during the observed analysis period. There are 3 attribute nodes that match ( marked with ) and 3 attribute nodes that do not match ( marked with ) this particular pattern in this particular session.

    Figure 301: Search — FIS flow view - a pattern with a low match percentage

With the baseline generated every day on average (usually during hours with less heavy traffic), the baseline itself is continuously changing. As a result, the available patterns are also continuously changing over time.

Pattern match percentage

The pattern match percentage is a percentage value displayed under the pattern selection drop-down list, next to the pattern name (for example, Pattern 0 | Pattern 1, and so on).

 

Figure 302: Search — FIS flow view - the pattern match percentage

The percentage value always matches the value displayed next to the Pattern options (other than the Default option) in the drop-down list. The percentage indicates to what percent the selected pattern matches this user's sessions during the observed analysis period. Patterns that appear in less than 10% of this user's sessions during the observed analysis period are not displayed in the drop-down list as Pattern options (but may appear in the overall sum of Total count data, as mentioned in Displaying further details of individual Connection segments.

Displaying further details of individual Connection segments

Hovering on an individual Connection segment of the visual displays the exact number of occurrences of that particular attribute value during the observed analysis period. When the Connection splits to several branches (for example, in the example below, the Connection splits into separate branches according to Bucketed starting hour), hovering over the branched Connection segment of your choice will display that particular attribute's further details (namely, the attribute data (for example, IP addresses), and the Total count).

NOTE: The Total count values include session data originating from patterns that appear in less than 10% of the user's sessions during the observed analysis period.

Figure 303: Search — Hovering on particular Connection segments to display further details

Replaying audit trails in your browser

The following section describes how to replay an audit trail in your browser.

NOTE: You can replay audit trails in your browser, or using the Safeguard Desktop Player application. Note that there are differences between these solutions.

For details on the Safeguard Desktop Player application, see Safeguard Desktop Player User Guide.

The following table details the differences between the solutions provided by the browser and the Safeguard Desktop Player application when replaying audit trails.

Browser Safeguard Desktop Player
Works without installation -
Works on any operating system Windows, Linux, Mac
Replays audit trails recorded with SPS 5 F4 and newer
Replays TN5250 sessions
Extracts files from SCP, SFTP, HTTP and RDP sessions -
Replays HTTP sessions - Only exports raw files from the command line
Replays X11 sessions
Starts replay while rendering is in progress
Follows 4-eyes connections -
Replays live streams in follow mode
Exports to PCAP -
Displays user input
Displays subtitles for video
Exports audit trail as video -
Exports screen content text -
Searches in the contents of the audit trails -

Caution:

From SPS version 6.10, you do not need to install the Google WebM Video for Microsoft Internet Explorer plugin to replay audit trails in your browser. The supported browsers are Google Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and IE11.

For SPS version 6.9 and earlier versions, even though the One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) web interface supports Internet Explorer and Microsoft Edge in general, to replay audit trails, you need to use Internet Explorer 11, and install the Google WebM Video for Microsoft Internet Explorer plugin. If you cannot install Internet Explorer 11 or another supported browser on your computer, use the the Safeguard Desktop Player application. For details, see "Replaying audit trails in your browser" in the Administration Guide and Safeguard Desktop Player User Guide.

NOTE: From SPS version 6.10 and onwards, you can play video files of audit trails both in central and in cluster environments. Previously, you could play the video files only on the Search Master node in a cluster environment. From SPS version 6.10 and onwards, you can play video files on Search Minion nodes as well.

To replay an audit trail in your browser

  1. On the Search page, select the audit trail you want to replay.

  2. To display the details of a connection, click . This page is called the details view.

  3. To play the video file, click .

  4. (Optional) For encrypted audit trails, upload any missing private keys and certificates. For more information on these procedures, see section Replaying encrypted audit trails in your browser.

    After uploading the private keys and the corresponding certificates, the encrypted upstream traffic elements are decrypted. The trail is decrypted and decompressed on the client-side. As a result, the encrypted elements will be displayed distributed in the video (see List of keyboard events, Show / hide events, and both versions of the Progress bar further in this section, in Replaying audit trails in your browser).

  5. (Optional) After uploading any missing private keys or certificates, to play the video, click .

    1. (Optional) If there are more channels that can be played, select the channel that you want to play in the Multiple channels are available dialog and click Play video.

      Figure 304: Multiple channels are available dialog

      The Player window opens.

For more information on how to use the browser to play video files, see Using the browser to play video files.

Using the browser to play video files

This section provides information on how to use the browser to play video files of recorded audit trails, or how to follow active sessions.

Figure 305: Replaying audit trails or following active sessions in your browser

Following active sessions

If you are following an active session, a green Following label is displayed in the top-right corner of the screen, and there is a green, pulsing dot on the menu bar. If you stop following the session, for example, by jumping back in the video, a green Follow button is displayed on the menu bar, which allows you to continue to follow the active session. If a session is not active anymore, the Following label and the green dot are not displayed.

Player window controls

TIP: You can quickly zoom in or out by clicking anywhere in the Player window.

NOTE: From the video, you can copy the content of text-based protocols to the clipboard:

  1. Select the required content.

  2. Right click on the selected content.

  3. From the list of available options, select Copy.

The Player window has the following controls:

  • , : Play, Pause.

  • ,: Jump to previous event, Jump to next event.

    If you use the button, the video playing is stopped so that you can jump back to preceding events.

  • : Adjust replay speed. The possible increments are: 0,25, 0,5, 1, 1,5, 2, 3, and 5.

  • Time-related information and options of audit trails:

    • : Time since the audit trail started / Length of the audit trail.

    • To jump to a timestamp in the video, click on the time.

      : Time since the audit trail started (top) / Jump to a timestamp (left) / Length of the audit trail (right).

    • : Time since the audit trail started when following an active session.

  • : List of keyboard events. Special characters like SHIFT, ENTER, F1, and so on, and mouse usage are displayed as buttons. If the upstream traffic is encrypted, upload your permanent or temporary keys to User menu > Audit keystore to display the keyboard events. This will not be displayed if your upstream traffic is encrypted but not unlocked.

  • : Share. You can copy the link of a session, or optionally, obtain the link of a session starting from a specific timestamp.

  • : Encoding settings. This option enables you to set the encoding for terminal-based and graphical protocols.

    For terminal-based protocols, you can set the following:

    • Terminal encoding layout

    • Telnet codec

    • Telnet alternate codec

    For graphical protocols, you can set the keyboard layout.

    You can save your video encoding settings, which are stored locally, in your browser.

  • : Create a screenshot.

  • : Show / hide events. Select the types of events to display. The available options are Keystroke, Mouse activity, and On-screen changes. Depending on the protocol used and how the audit trail was processed, SPS can display keyboard events, commands, mouse events, and window titles. Commands and window titles are displayed as subtitles at the bottom of the screen. This will not be displayed if your upstream traffic is encrypted but not unlocked.

  • , : Switching fullscreen mode on and off

  • : Progress bar and distribution of events. Light blue - screen change, blue - keyboard or mouse event, dark blue - command or title event. This will not be displayed if your upstream traffic is encrypted but not unlocked.

  • : Close the player, and return to the Connection details page.

Viewing encrypted screenshots

This section provides information on how to view encrypted screenshots and on the private keys that are necessary to view them.

Prerequisites

To view encrypted screenshots in the Search interface, you have to upload the necessary private encryption keys to your audit keystore. Only RSA keys (in PEM-encoded X.509 certificates) can be uploaded to the audit keystore.

One Identity recommends using 2048-bit RSA keys (or stronger).

The private keys are stored locally, in your browser.

NOTE: If you clear your browser’s data, your audit keystore could be deleted. If your audit keystore is deleted, upload your private keys again.

To view encrypted screenshots

  1. On the Search page, select an encrypted audit trail.

  2. To display the details of a connection, click . This page is called the details view.

  3. To access the list of encrypted screenshots of the selected audit trail, click Events in the details view.

  4. Click the screenshot that you want to view.

  5. (Optional) Unlock your keystore.

    If you have private keys stored in your audit keystore, the Unlock keystore dialog is displayed.

    Figure 306: Unlock keystore — Enter your master password

    Enter your master password and click Unlock keystore.

    The keystore is unlocked and you can use your keys or you can add new keys.

  6. (Optional) If there is a missing private key, the Private keys missing dialog opens.

    Figure 307: Private keys missing dialog

    Click Upload private keys, which takes you to User menu > Audit keystore, where you can add the keys.

  7. (Optional) If necessary, add any missing certificates on Basic settings > Local services > Indexer service.

    Previously, the audit keystore was used to store certificates as well as private keys. From SPS version 6.10 and onwards, you must upload the certificates to Basic settings > Local services > Indexer service.

    For more information on how to add certificates, see Configuring the internal indexer.

Result

Once you add the necessary private keys to your audit keystore, you can view the encrypted screenshots in the Search interface.

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