One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions 6.2.0 - Administration Guide

Preface Introduction The concepts of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) The Welcome Wizard and the first login Basic settings
Supported web browsers and operating systems The structure of the web interface Network settings Configuring date and time System logging, SNMP and e-mail alerts Configuring system monitoring on SPS Data and configuration backups Archiving and cleanup Forwarding data to third-party systems Joining to One Identity Starling
User management and access control Managing One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
Controlling One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS): reboot, shutdown Managing Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) clusters Managing a High Availability One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) cluster Upgrading One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Managing the One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) license Accessing the One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) console Sealed mode Out-of-band management of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Managing the certificates used on One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
General connection settings HTTP-specific settings ICA-specific settings RDP-specific settings SSH-specific settings Telnet-specific settings VMware Horizon View connections VNC-specific settings Indexing audit trails Using the Search interface Advanced authentication and authorization techniques Reports The One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) RPC API The One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) REST API One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) scenarios Troubleshooting One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Using SPS with SPP Configuring external devices Using SCP with agent-forwarding Security checklist for configuring One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Jumplists for in-product help LDAP user and group resolution in SPS

Using UPN usernames in audited SSH connections

When you specify user names in a User Principal Name (UPN) format (e-mail address as username) for an SPS-audited SSH connection, the connection is unsuccessful.

The connection is unsuccessful because SPS uses the '@' character in the username as inband destination selection. If this happens, the username is stripped from the domain part and the UPN suffix is interpreted as inband target. For example, if using test@ema.il as username, the username for the connection will be 'test' and the inband destination is 'ema.il'. SPS interprets the last two '@' characters from the connection string, for example, username@my-inband-target@SPS.

To avoid this, you must use inband destination selection. By specifying the target host explicitly, you can prevent SPS to misinterpret the '@' character from UPN usernames.

Using SPS with SPP

You can join your One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) deployment to your One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Passwords (SPP) deployment. That way you can jointly use the features of the two deployments.

Both appliances provide different functionality. You can use them together or independently from each other.

SPP provides:

  • Machine and account discovery

  • Password rotation and management

  • Advanced access request and approval workflows

  • A user portal and desktop application to initiate connections

SPS provides:

  • Transparent or non-transparent interception of remote admin protocols (SSH, RDP, Telnet, Citrix ICA, and VNC)

  • Audit recording and video-like playback of sessions

  • Inband authentication of the monitored users independently from the target servers

  • Basic access control policy enforcement

  • Advanced search and reporting capabilities in the audit records

  • Built-in user behavior analytics for the recorded sessions (One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Analytics)

Passwords-initiated (SPP-initiated) workflow

In the Passwords-initiated workflow, the users initiate sessions from SPP. In this workflow SPP uses SPS as a session-recording device.

You can use your browser or the One Identity Safeguard desktop client to request access from SPP and initiate the connection to the target server via SPS. SPP creates an access string for the user’s SSH or RDP client that allows these clients to connect to the target server via SPS, so SPS can audit and record the session. In this sense this workflow is nontransparent, the user must use a browser or the One Identity Safeguard desktop client.

This is what all SPS users who bought the Sessions Module use before SPP version 2.7.

For details on configuring this workflow, see Configuring SPP for Passwords-initiated workflow.

Sessions-initiated (SPS-initiated) workflow

In the Sessions-initiated workflow, the users initiate sessions from SPS. In this workflow SPS uses SPP as a credential store.

This workflow is transparent in the sense that you can connect to the target server or to SPS directly using your SSH or RDP client application. SPS authenticates these clients and communicates with SPP to get the password for the target server. It then uses that password to open the connection. Authentication happens on SPS, while authorization happens on SPP based on the user's entitlements.

This is what old and new users of standalone SPS are likely to prefer.

The usual SPP Access Requests workflows that SPP provides are supported:

Configuring the Passwords-initiated workflow

Passwords-initiated (SPP-initiated) workflow

In the Passwords-initiated workflow, the users initiate sessions from SPP. In this workflow SPP uses SPS as a session-recording device.

You can use your browser or the One Identity Safeguard desktop client to request access from SPP and initiate the connection to the target server via SPS. SPP creates an access string for the user’s SSH or RDP client that allows these clients to connect to the target server via SPS, so SPS can audit and record the session. In this sense this workflow is nontransparent, the user must use a browser or the One Identity Safeguard desktop client.

This is what all SPS users who bought the Sessions Module use before SPP version 2.7.

For details on configuring this workflow, see Configuring SPP for Passwords-initiated workflow.

Prerequisites
  • Minimum versions:

    • SPP version 2.7

    • SPS version 6.0

  • You must have built an SPS cluster by promoting an SPS node to the role of the Central Management node, even if it is a single node. For more information, see Building a cluster.

To configure the Passwords-initiated (SPP-initiated) workflow

  1. On SPS, join SPP and SPS as described in Joining SPS to SPP.

  2. Configure SPP to use the joined SPS as described in Configuring SPP for Passwords-initiated workflow.

  3. Optionally, customize monitoring settings as follows:

    • To make use of the more advanced features of SPS, you can change the safeguard_default Connection Policy or create a new Connection Policy and select that in SPP.

    • The critical setting is the AA plugin – make sure you use the same one as what the auto-generated one uses.

Configuring SPP for Passwords-initiated workflow

To configure SPP to use the joined SPS in Passwords-initiated (SPP-initiated) workflows, complete the following steps. For details on the workflow, see Using SPS with SPP.

Prerequisites

To configure SPP for Passwords-initiated workflow

  1. On SPP, assign the managed networks for sessions management.

    1. Navigate to Administrative Tools > Settings > Cluster > Managed Networks.

    2. Add the network you want to monitor with SPS and choose the SPS appliance for the Sessions Managed By field.

  2. Select the SPS for the access request policy.

    1. Navigate to Administrative Tools > Entitlements > Access Request Policies > (create or edit a policy).

    2. On the Session Settings tab of the selected policy, select the SPS Connection Policy. The IP address of the cluster master is displayed first followed by the SPS Connection Policy name (safeguard_default by default).

Related Documents