One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions 6.2.0 - Administration Guide

Preface Introduction The concepts of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) The Welcome Wizard and the first login Basic settings
Supported web browsers and operating systems The structure of the web interface Network settings Configuring date and time System logging, SNMP and e-mail alerts Configuring system monitoring on SPS Data and configuration backups Archiving and cleanup Forwarding data to third-party systems Joining to One Identity Starling
User management and access control Managing One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
Controlling One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS): reboot, shutdown Managing Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) clusters Managing a High Availability One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) cluster Upgrading One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Managing the One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) license Accessing the One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) console Sealed mode Out-of-band management of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Managing the certificates used on One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
General connection settings HTTP-specific settings ICA-specific settings RDP-specific settings SSH-specific settings Telnet-specific settings VMware Horizon View connections VNC-specific settings Indexing audit trails Using the Search interface Advanced authentication and authorization techniques Reports The One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) RPC API The One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) REST API One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) scenarios Troubleshooting One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Using SPS with SPP Configuring external devices Using SCP with agent-forwarding Security checklist for configuring One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Jumplists for in-product help LDAP user and group resolution in SPS

Collecting logs and system information for error reporting

To track down support requests, the One Identity Support Team might request you to collect system-state and debugging information. This information is collected automatically, and contains log files, the configuration file of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS), and various system-statistics.

NOTE:

Sensitive data like key files and passwords are automatically removed from the files, that is, configuration files do not contain passwords or keys. However, if you increase the proxy verbosity level to 8-10 in the Global Options, then for troubleshooting purposes, the logs can contain highly sensitive data, for example, passwords and keys in plain text format. If you are concerned about the presence of sensitive data, check the collected log files before submitting to the Support Portal.

The Basic Settings > Management > Verbose system logs > Enable option is not related to the verbosity of log messages: it adds the commands executed by the SPS web interface to the log.

To collect system-state information (also known as a support bundle), navigate to Basic Settings > Troubleshooting > Create support bundle and click Create support bundle, then save the created zip file. The name of the file uses the debug_info-<hostname>YYYYMMDDHHMM format.

To collect information for a specific error

If the problem you want to reproduce requires a reboot, see Collecting logs and system information of the boot process for error reporting instead.

  1. Navigate to Basic Settings > Troubleshooting > Create support bundle.

    Figure 303: Basic Settings > Troubleshooting > Create support bundle — Collecting debug information

  2. Click Start.

  3. (Optional) If the error you want to reproduce is related to the audited network traffic, for example, it occurs when a used connects to a protected SSH server, consider increasing the log level of the related traffic (for example, SSH). For details, see Changing log verbosity level of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS).

    Note that earlier versions of SPS increased the log level of the audited traffic automatically.

  4. Reproduce the event that causes the error, for example connect to a server.

  5. Click Stop.

  6. Click Save support bundle with debug logs and save the created zip file. The name of the file uses the debug_info-<hostname>YYYYMMDDHHMM format.

    SPS includes the configuration files of any plugins installed. Note that depending on the plugin, these configuration files can contain sensitive information, such as passwords or API keys. In this case, edit the plugin-related files in the plugins directory of the support bundle and delete the sensitive information.

  7. (Optional) If you have increased the verbosity level of the audited network traffic, decrease it to the default level.

  8. Attach the file to your support ticket.

Collecting logs and system information of the boot process for error reporting

If you have a problem related to the boot process of the appliance, the One Identity Support Team might request you to collect system-state and debugging information about the boot process. This information is collected automatically, and contains log files, the configuration file of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS), and various system-statistics.

If the problem you want to reproduce does not require a reboot, see Collecting logs and system information for error reporting instead.

To collect information about the boot process

  1. Navigate to Basic Settings > Management > Verbose system logs > Enable.

  2. (Optional) If the error you want to reproduce is related to the audited network traffic, for example, it occurs when a used connects to a protected SSH server, consider increasing the log level of the related traffic (for example, SSH). For details, see Changing log verbosity level of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS).

    Note that earlier versions of SPS increased the log level of the audited traffic automatically.

  3. Reproduce the event that causes the error (for example, reboot the appliance).

  4. Navigate to Basic Settings > Troubleshooting > Create support bundle and click Create support bundle.

    Figure 304: Basic Settings > Troubleshooting > Create support bundle — Collecting debug information

  5. Click Save support bundle with debug logs and save the created zip file. The name of the file uses the debug_info-<hostname>YYYYMMDDHHMM format.

    SPS includes the configuration files of any plugins installed. Note that depending on the plugin, these configuration files can contain sensitive information, such as passwords or API keys. In this case, edit the plugin-related files in the plugins directory of the support bundle and delete the sensitive information.

  6. (Optional) If you have increased the verbosity level of the audited network traffic, decrease it to the default level.

  7. Navigate to Basic Settings > Management > Verbose system logs > Disable.

  8. Attach the file to your support ticket.

Support hotfixes

This section describes support hotfixes and their installation in One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS).

Support hotfixes are official additions (signed .deb packages created by the Support Team) to a specific SPS release. By uploading a hotfix to an SPS appliance, it is possible to apply a modification (for example, a bugfix) quickly and without making the firmware Tainted. The hotfix files only work with the version of SPS they are created for.

You can upload the hotfix file you received from our Support Team in the SPS user interface.

Caution:

Consider the following:

  • Clicking Upload immediately installs the hotfix to SPS.
  • Installing multiple hotfix files to a single configuration of SPS is possible, but you cannot delete an individual hotfix file from SPS without the Support Team's assistance.
  • Installing a new firmware will delete all hotfix files installed on the previous version of SPS.

If you have to delete an individual hotfix file from SPS without installing a new firmware first, contact our Support Team.

Installing support hotfixes

This section describes the most important requirements and information regarding the installation procedure of support hotfixes.

Prerequisites

The hotfix files are normally not publicly accessible for download (unless attached to Knowledgebase Articles). As a result, if you want to install them to your SPS, you must first contact our Support Team for a hotfix file specifically created for your request. Consider that you cannot delete the installed hotfix file from SPS without the Support Team's assistance. In addition, rebooting the SPS appliance after deleting an installed hotfix is necessary. We strongly recommend that you only install hotfixes to SPS if you contact our Support Team for instructions beforehand.

NOTE:

The hotfix files only work with the version of SPS they are created for. SPS automatically checks their version during upload.

To install the support hotfix file

  1. Navigate to Basic Settings > System > Firmwares.

    Figure 305: Uploading a hotfix file in the SPS user interface

  2. Under the Upload new hotfix: section, click Choose File and select the hotfix file you want to upload.
  3. Click Upload.

    Caution:

    Consider the following:

    • Clicking Upload immediately installs the hotfix to SPS.
    • Installing multiple hotfix files to a single configuration of SPS is possible, but you cannot delete an individual hotfix file from SPS without the Support Team's assistance.
    • Installing a new firmware will delete all hotfix files installed on the previous version of SPS.

    If you have to delete an individual hotfix file from SPS without installing a new firmware first, contact our Support Team.

  4. If installation is successful, SPS will list information about the hotfix under Installed hotfixes:, such as Name, Version and Description.

    NOTE:

    Upload will fail in the following cases:

    • The hotfix file version does not pass the version check.
    • The hotfix file package is not properly signed by our Support Team.
    • The file you want to upload is not an appropriate .deb package or the file is corrupted.

    If upload fails, SPS will revert to its previous state automatically.

Status history and statistics

SPS displays various statistics and status history of system data and performance on the dashboard at Basic Settings > Dashboard. The dashboard is essentially an extension of the system monitor: the system monitor displays only the current values, while the dashboard creates graphs and statistics of the system parameters.

The dashboard consists of different modules. Every module displays the history of a system parameter for the current day. To display the graph for a longer period (last week, last month, or last year), select the Week, Month, or Year options, respectively. Hovering the mouse over a module enlarges the graph and displays the color code used on the graph.

All types of data is collected every five minutes. This means that if changes are more frequent, it might not be represented in the graphs.

NOTE:

If all parameters displayed are 0 at a certain point in time, it might mean that at that time One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) was not functional (for example, turned off or unresponsive). Or, in certain cases it might also mean that there was no information at that time.

NOTE:

If you want to compare data displayed on the Dashboard to data displayed on the System Monitor, they might be different, because data on System Monitor is based on SNMP values, whereas data on the related Dashboard modules are based on the output of different commands.

To display statistics of a module as a table for the selected period, click on the graph.

Figure 306: Basic Settings > Dashboard — The dashboard

The following modules are displayed on the dashboard of SPS:

  • Connection statistics: Number of active connections per protocol.

  • Memory: The memory used by the system.

  • Disk: Filesystem usage for the different partitions.

  • CPU: CPU usage.

  • Network connections: Number of network connections.

  • Physical interface 1 (eth0): Traffic on physical interface 1.

  • Physical interface 2 (eth1): Traffic on physical interface 2.

  • Physical interface 3 (eth2): Traffic on physical interface 3.

  • Load average: Average load of the system.

  • Number of processes: The number of running processes.

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