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One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions 6.4.0 - Administration Guide

Preface Introduction The concepts of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) The Welcome Wizard and the first login Basic settings
Supported web browsers and operating systems The structure of the web interface Network settings Configuring date and time System logging, SNMP and e-mail alerts Configuring system monitoring on SPS Data and configuration backups Archiving and cleanup Forwarding data to third-party systems Joining to One Identity Starling
User management and access control Managing One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
Controlling One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS): reboot, shutdown Managing Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) clusters Managing a High Availability One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) cluster Upgrading One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Managing the One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) license Accessing the One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) console Sealed mode Out-of-band management of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Managing the certificates used on One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
General connection settings HTTP-specific settings ICA-specific settings MSSQL-specific settings RDP-specific settings SSH-specific settings Telnet-specific settings VMware Horizon View connections VNC-specific settings Indexing audit trails Using the Search interface Advanced authentication and authorization techniques Reports The One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) RPC API The One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) REST API One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) scenarios Troubleshooting One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Using SPS with SPP Configuring external devices Using SCP with agent-forwarding Security checklist for configuring One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Jumplists for in-product help Configuring SPS to use an LDAP backend Glossary

Monitoring the status of nodes in your cluster

The following describes how to monitor the status of nodes in your cluster.

To monitor the status of nodes in your cluster

  1. On the web interface of your Central Management node, navigate to Basic Settings > Cluster management. This page displays all nodes of a cluster.

    Figure 97: Basic Settings > Cluster management — Monitor status of nodes

    The following status information is displayed for each node:

    • Last seen: The last time the node sent status information to the Central Management node, in ISO 8601 format.

    • Last updated: The last time the node's configuration was synchronized, in ISO 8601 format.

    • Configuration status: Indicates the status of configuration synchronization. It has the following values:
      • UP-TO-DATE: The node has fetched the latest configuration from the Central Management node, and has applied it. It is in sync with the Central Management node.
      • PENDING: There has been a configuration change on the Central Management node, and the change has not been synchronized yet to the node.
      • OUTDATED: There has been some error on the node and therefore it is running an old configuration.
      • N/A: This can mean the following:
        • The node has not fetched any configuration yet.
        • The node is the Central Management node, so it is not fetching its configuration from any other node.
    • Status: Indicates whether any issues occurred during configuration synchronization. It has the following values:

      • OK: Configuration synchronization was successful, no issues occurred.

      • ISSUES: While synchronizing configuration, some issue(s) occurred. Click ISSUES to find out the details.

      • OFFLINE: Indicates that status information was sent by the node longer than 60 seconds ago.

    You can monitor the status of your nodes through the REST API, too. For details, see "Query the status of all nodes in the cluster" in the REST API Reference Guide and "Query one particular node" in the REST API Reference Guide.

Updating the IP address of a node in a cluster

When you have joined a node to a cluster, you can still change the IP address of the node if it is a Managed Host node.

To update the IP address of a Managed Host node that is already the member of a cluster

  1. On the web interface of your Central Management node, navigate to Basic Settings > Cluster management.
  2. Click next to the Managed Host node that you want to update.
  3. In the Address field, update the IP address of the node.

    Caution:

    Ensure that you are making the change for the Managed Host node. Do not change the IP address of the Central Management node.

    Figure 98: Basic Settings > Cluster management — Update IP address of node

  4. Click Commit.
  5. On the web interface of the node whose IP address you want to update, navigate to Basic Settings > Network > Interfaces.
  6. In the Address field, update the IP address of the node.

    Figure 99: Basic Settings > Network > Interfaces — Update IP address of node

  7. Click Commit.

Managing a cluster with configuration synchronization without central search

You can configure your SPS cluster in the following ways:

  • Configuration synchronization without a central search.

    It allows you to perform your configuration settings on your Central Management node. Managed Host nodes periodically fetch and merge the settings into their own (configuration synchronization). Central search is not configured and you can search for sessions on each node, including the Central Management node.

    For more information, see Configuration synchronization without a central search.

  • Central search with configuration synchronization.

    IMPORTANT: One Identity does not recommend having a central search configuration without configuration synchronization.

    It allows you to use a Central Management node with a Search Master role to view session data recorded by the minion nodes of your cluster, as well as manage all the nodes in the cluster from one central location.

    For more information, see Central search with configuration synchronization.

The following figure shows a cluster with configuration synchronization without central search.

Figure 100: Configuration synchronization without central search

The figure above is an example of an SPS cluster configured as follows:

  • There is a Central Management node.
  • There are two Managed Host nodes (Managed Host node 1 and 2).
  • The Central Management node is connected to the two Managed Host nodes.
  • The Managed Host nodes fetch their configuration from the Central Management node, and merge it into their own configuration.
  • The Managed Host nodes send their status information to the Central Management node every 10 seconds.

The Central Management node and the connected Managed Host nodes require different configuration settings as described in the table below:

Table 6: Managing a configuration synchronization without a central search
Role Use and configuration settings

Central Management node

  • Use it as a node with a central configuration, which is synchronized to the other nodes of the cluster.

  • Perform your configuration settings on this node. Managed Host nodes periodically fetch and merge these configuration settings into their own (configuration synchronization).

  • For backup and archive, configure a backup and archive server on your minion node, as well as on your Central Management node.

  • Ensure that you configure high availability (HA) for each node (for both your Central Management node and the Managed Host nodes). Also ensure that the Central Management node has a system backup configured.
  • You can search for all the sessions recorded on this node.

Managed Host node

  • Use it to record sessions and send status information to the Central Management node.

  • Do not perform configuration settings on the minion. These are overwritten during configuration synchronization.

    NOTE: All configuration settings that you make on the minions are overwritten during configuration synchronization except the node specific configuration.

  • Set external and internal indexers.

  • For backup and archive, configure a backup and archive server on your minion node, as well as on your Central Management node.

  • Ensure that you configure high availability (HA) for each node (for both your Central Management node and the Managed Host nodes). Also ensure that the Central Management node has a system backup configured.
  • You can search for all the sessions recorded on this node.

For more information on each role, see Cluster roles.

Managing a cluster with central search configuration and configuration synchronization

You can configure your SPS cluster in the following ways:

  • Configuration synchronization without a central search.

    It allows you to perform your configuration settings on your Central Management node. Managed Host nodes periodically fetch and merge the settings into their own (configuration synchronization). Central search is not configured and you can search for sessions on each node, including the Central Management node.

    For more information, see Configuration synchronization without a central search.

  • Central search with configuration synchronization.

    IMPORTANT: One Identity does not recommend having a central search configuration without configuration synchronization.

    It allows you to use a Central Management node with a Search Master role to view session data recorded by the minion nodes of your cluster, as well as manage all the nodes in the cluster from one central location.

    For more information, see Central search with configuration synchronization.

The following figure shows a cluster configured for central search with configuration synchronization.

Figure 101: Central search with configuration synchronization

The figure above is an example of an SPS cluster configured as follows:

  • There is a Central Management node, which has a Search Master role.
  • There are two Managed Host nodes (Managed Host node 1 and 2), each configured with a Search Minion role.
  • The Central Management node is connected to the two minion nodes.
  • The minion nodes record sessions, which are displayed on the Search interface of the Central Management node.
  • The minion nodes fetch their configuration from the Central Management node, and merge it into their own configuration.

The Central Management node with a Search Master role and the connected Managed Host nodes with Search Minion roles require different configuration settings as described in the table below:

Table 7: Managing a central search configuration
Role Use and configuration settings

Central Management node, Search Master

  • Use it for viewing session data recorded by minions as well as managing all the nodes in the cluster.
  • Perform your configuration settings on this node. Managed Host nodes periodically fetch and merge these configuration settings into their own (configuration synchronization).

  • For backup and archive, configure a backup server on your Central Management node and an archive server on your minion node.

  • Ensure that you configure high availability (HA) for each node (for both your Central Management node and the Managed Host nodes). Also ensure that the Central Management node has a system backup configured.
  • This node cannot be used to record sessions.

Managed Host node, Search Minion

  • Use it to record sessions and store audit trail files.
  • Do not perform configuration settings on the minion. These are overwritten during configuration synchronization.

    NOTE: All configuration settings that you make on the minions are overwritten during configuration synchronization except the node specific configuration.

  • Set external and internal indexers.

  • For backup and archive, configure an archive server on your minion node, and a backup server on your Central Management node.

  • Ensure that you configure high availability (HA) for each node (for both your Central Management node and the Managed Host nodes). Also ensure that the Central Management node has a system backup configured.

For more information on each role, see Cluster roles.

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