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One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions 6.4.0 - Administration Guide

Preface Introduction The concepts of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) The Welcome Wizard and the first login Basic settings
Supported web browsers and operating systems The structure of the web interface Network settings Configuring date and time System logging, SNMP and e-mail alerts Configuring system monitoring on SPS Data and configuration backups Archiving and cleanup Forwarding data to third-party systems Joining to One Identity Starling
User management and access control Managing One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
Controlling One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS): reboot, shutdown Managing Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) clusters Managing a High Availability One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) cluster Upgrading One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Managing the One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) license Accessing the One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) console Sealed mode Out-of-band management of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Managing the certificates used on One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
General connection settings HTTP-specific settings ICA-specific settings MSSQL-specific settings RDP-specific settings SSH-specific settings Telnet-specific settings VMware Horizon View connections VNC-specific settings Indexing audit trails Using the Search interface Advanced authentication and authorization techniques Reports The One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) RPC API The One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) REST API One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) scenarios Troubleshooting One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Using SPS with SPP Configuring external devices Using SCP with agent-forwarding Security checklist for configuring One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Jumplists for in-product help Configuring SPS to use an LDAP backend Glossary

Network Level Authentication (NLA) with One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)

You can configure One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) to use Network Level Authentication (NLA) in two different scenarios.

Topics:

Network Level Authentication (NLA) with domain membership

To use Credential Security Service Provider (CredSSP, also called Network Level Authentication or NLA) when One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) is member of the domain. If you cannot or do not want to join SPS to the domain, see "Network Level Authentication without domain membership" in the Administration Guide.

Prerequisites

The target servers and SPS must be in the same domain, or you must establish trust between the domains that contain the target servers and SPS. For details on the type of trust required, see "Using One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) across multiple domains" in the Administration Guide.

To use NLA with domain membership

  1. Navigate to RDP Control > Settings, and select the Enable Network Level Authentication option. (If you will have connections that will not use Network Level Authentication, create a separate RDP Settings policy).

  2. Navigate to RDP Control > Domain membership.

  3. Enter the name of the domain (for example mydomain) into the Domain field.

    Figure 182: RDP Control > Domain membership — Joining a domain

  4. Enter the name of the realm (for example mydomain.example.com) into the Full domain name field.

    NOTE:

    Ensure that your DNS settings are correct and that the full domain name can be resolved from SPS. To check this, navigate to Basic Settings > Troubleshooting > Ping, enter the full domain name into the Hostname field, and select Ping host.

  5. Click Commit.

  6. Click Join domain. A pop-up window is displayed.

  7. SPS requires an account to your domain to be able to join the domain. Enter the following information:

    • The name of the user into the Username field.

    • The password into the Password field.

      NOTE:

      One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) accepts passwords that are not longer than 150 characters. Unicode characters as well as the following special characters can be used: !"#$%&'()*+,-./:;<=>?@[\]^-`{|}

    • The name of your domain controller into the Domain controller field. If you leave this field blank, SPS tries to find the domain controller automatically.

      NOTE:

      Ensure that your DNS settings are correct and that the hostname of the domain controller can be resolved from SPS. To check this, navigate to Basic Settings > Troubleshooting > Ping, enter the name of the domain controller into the Hostname field, and select Ping host.

    • The organizational unit (OU) into the Organization unit field.

      The OU string reads from top to bottom without RDNs, and is delimited by a '/'. Note that '\' is used for escape by both the shell and ldap, so it may need to be doubled or quadrupled to pass through, and it is not used as a delimiter.

  8. Click Join domain.

  9. If successful, SPS displays the name of the domain it joined.

    NOTE:

    If you need SPS to leave the domain for some reason, click Leave domain.

Using One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) across multiple domains

If your users are in a domain (EXAMPLE-DOMAIN), One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) is also in that domain (EXAMPLE-DOMAIN), but your users need to access servers that are in a different domain (OTHER-DOMAIN), you must establish a level of trust between the domains. This is summarized in the following table.

Domain username of the client Domain of the target server Result
EXAMPLE-DOMAIN\myusername EXAMPLE-DOMAIN Connection is established
EXAMPLE-DOMAIN\myusername OTHER-DOMAIN If OTHER-DOMAIN trusts EXAMPLE-DOMAIN, the connection is established
OTHER-DOMAIN\myusername OTHER-DOMAIN If two-way trust is established between OTHER-DOMAIN and EXAMPLE-DOMAIN, the connection is established
OTHER-DOMAIN\myusername EXAMPLE-DOMAIN If two-way trust is established between OTHER-DOMAIN and EXAMPLE-DOMAIN, the connection is established
NOTE:

If you use an LDAP database when using SPS accross multiple domains, LDAP will only use the username without the domain name to verify the group membership.

Network Level Authentication without domain membership

There are scenarios when you want to use One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) to monitor RDP access to servers that accept only Network Level Authentication (NLA, also called CredSSP), but the client, SPS, and the server are not in the same domain (there is no trust between their domains), or any of them is not in a domain at all. For example, you cannot add SPS to the domain for some reason, or the RDP server is a standalone server that is not part of a domain. The following table shows such a scenario.

User Client domain membership SPS domain membership Server domain membership
local or any domain any domain not a domain member, or other than <server-domain> <server-domain>
Limitations
  • Server-side redirection may not work.

To use NLA without domain membership

  1. Navigate to RDP Control > Settings, and select the RDP settings policy that you use in your connection policies.

  2. Clear the Enable Network Level Authentication > Require domain membership option.

  3. Click Commit.

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