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One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions 6.4.0 - Administration Guide

Preface Introduction The concepts of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) The Welcome Wizard and the first login Basic settings
Supported web browsers and operating systems The structure of the web interface Network settings Configuring date and time System logging, SNMP and e-mail alerts Configuring system monitoring on SPS Data and configuration backups Archiving and cleanup Forwarding data to third-party systems Joining to One Identity Starling
User management and access control Managing One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
Controlling One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS): reboot, shutdown Managing Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) clusters Managing a High Availability One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) cluster Upgrading One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Managing the One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) license Accessing the One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) console Sealed mode Out-of-band management of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Managing the certificates used on One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
General connection settings HTTP-specific settings ICA-specific settings MSSQL-specific settings RDP-specific settings SSH-specific settings Telnet-specific settings VMware Horizon View connections VNC-specific settings Indexing audit trails Using the Search interface Advanced authentication and authorization techniques Reports The One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) RPC API The One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) REST API One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) scenarios Troubleshooting One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Using SPS with SPP Configuring external devices Using SCP with agent-forwarding Security checklist for configuring One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Jumplists for in-product help Configuring SPS to use an LDAP backend Glossary

The closed_connection_audit_channels view

NOTE:

The structure of these database tables may change in future One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) versions.

This view returns all audited channels whose connection have been closed. The view is defined as follows:

create view closed_connection_audit_channels
as
select *
from channels
where audit is not null
and index_status = 1;

For details on the returned columns, see The channels table.

The closed_not_indexed_audit_channels view

NOTE:

The structure of these database tables may change in future One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) versions.

This view returns all audited channels whose connection have been closed, but have not been indexed yet. The view is defined as follows:

create view closed_not_indexed_audit_channels
as
select *
from channels
where audit is not null
and (index_status = 1
or index_status = 2);

For details on the returned columns, see The channels table.

The connection_events view

NOTE:

The structure of these database tables may change in future One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) versions.

For terminal connections, this view collects the commands issued in a connection. For graphical connections, this view collects the window titles detected in the connection. The view is defined as follows:

select
    channels._connection_channel_id as id,
    events.event,  
    events.printable
from channels,  
    events
where channels.id = events.channel_id;

Querying the table (for example, select * from connection_events limit 10;) will return results similar to the following:

 id |                                         event             | printable
----+-------------------------------------------------------------+-----------
1  | [user@exampleserver ~]$ ls                                  | t
1  | [user@exampleserver ~]$ exit                                | t
2  | [user@exampleserver ~]$ su -                                | t
2  | Password:                                                   | t
2  | [root@exampleserver ~]#                                     | t
2  | [root@exampleserver ~]# ifconfig                            | t
2  | [root@exampleserver ~]# ifconfig                            | t
2  | [root@exampleserver ~]# ifconfig                            | t
4  | [user@exampleserver ~]$                                     | t
4  | [user@exampleserver ~]$                                     | t

The connection_events view has the following columns.

Table 18: Columns of the connection_events table
Column Type Description
event text The command executed, or the window title detected in the channel (for example, ls, exit, or Firefox).
id integer The unique ID number of the entry.
printable boolean Set to 1 if every character of the command can be displayed.

The connection_occurrences view

The view is defined as follows:

select
    channels._connection_channel_id as id,
    results.token,
    occurrences.start_time,
    occurrences.end_time,
    occurrences.screenshot
from channels,
     results,  
     occurrences
where channels.id = results.channel_id
and results.id = occurrences.result_id;
NOTE:

The structure of these database tables may change in future One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) versions.

Table 19: Columns of the connection_occurrences table
Column Type Description
end_time integer

End time: Date when the channel was closed.

id text The unique id of the entry.
screenshot text The filename of the PNG screenshot (as stored on SPS) about the occurrence of the search token.
start_time integer

Start time: Date when the channel was started.

token text The search token visible on the screenshot.
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