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One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions 6.4.0 - Administration Guide

Preface Introduction The concepts of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) The Welcome Wizard and the first login Basic settings
Supported web browsers and operating systems The structure of the web interface Network settings Configuring date and time System logging, SNMP and e-mail alerts Configuring system monitoring on SPS Data and configuration backups Archiving and cleanup Forwarding data to third-party systems Joining to One Identity Starling
User management and access control Managing One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
Controlling One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS): reboot, shutdown Managing Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) clusters Managing a High Availability One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) cluster Upgrading One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Managing the One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) license Accessing the One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) console Sealed mode Out-of-band management of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Managing the certificates used on One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
General connection settings HTTP-specific settings ICA-specific settings MSSQL-specific settings RDP-specific settings SSH-specific settings Telnet-specific settings VMware Horizon View connections VNC-specific settings Indexing audit trails Using the Search interface Advanced authentication and authorization techniques Reports The One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) RPC API The One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) REST API One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) scenarios Troubleshooting One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Using SPS with SPP Configuring external devices Using SCP with agent-forwarding Security checklist for configuring One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Jumplists for in-product help Configuring SPS to use an LDAP backend Glossary

The One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) REST API

Starting with One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) version 4 F2, certain parts and features of SPS can be configured using a REST API (Representational State Transfer Application Programming Interface). The REST server conforms to the Hypermedia as the Engine of Application State (HATEOAS).

The SPS REST API uses JSON over HTTPS. The REST server has a single entry point and all resources are available at paths (URLs) returned in the response for a request sent to the entry point. The only path that is guaranteed not to change is /api/authentication. Every other path should be reached by navigating the links returned.

The SPS REST API allows you to create, read, update and delete (CRUD) the configuration resources of SPS.

The user accessing the SPS REST API must have the REST server privilege. For details, see "Modifying group privileges" in the Administration Guide. Note that the built-in api usergroup does not have this privilege by default, it is used to access the SOAP RPC API of SPS.

For details on using the REST API, see REST API Reference Guide.

One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) scenarios

This section discusses common scenarios for One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS).

Topics:

Configuring public-key authentication on One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)

If a protected server requires public-key authentication from the users, complete one of the following procedures.

Configuring public-key authentication using local keys

The following describes how to store the public keys of the users and the private-public keypair used in the server-side connection locally on One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS).

To configure public-key authentication using local keys

  1. Navigate to Policies > Local User Databases and create a Local User Database. Add the users and their public keys to the database. SPS will authenticate the clients to this database. For details on creating and maintaining local user databases, see Creating a Local User Database.

  2. Navigate to Policies > Credential Stores and create a Local Credential Store. Add hostnames and the users to the database. SPS will use these credentials to authenticate on the target server. For details on creating local credential stores, see Configuring local Credential Stores.

  3. Navigate to SSH Control > Authentication Policies and create a new Authentication Policy.

  4. Select Authenticate the client to SPS using > Local > Public key, clear all other options.

  5. Select the appropriate usergroup from the Local User Database field. SPS will authenticate the users to this local database.

  6. Select Relayed authentication methods > Public key > Fix, clear all other options.

  7. Click > Generate. This will generate a private key that is needed only for the configuration, it will not be used in any connection.

    NOTE:

    The Connection Policy will ignore the settings for server-side authentication (set under Relayed authentication methods) if a Credential Store is used in the Connection Policy.

  8. Click Commit.

  9. Navigate to SSH Control > Connections and create a new Connection.

  10. Enter the IP addresses of the clients and the servers into the From and To fields.

  11. Select the authentication policy created in Step 1 in the Authentication Policy field.

  12. Configure the other options of the connection as necessary.

  13. Click Commit.

  14. To test the above settings, initiate a connection from the client machine to the server.

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