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One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions 6.7.2 - Administration Guide

Preface Introduction The concepts of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
The philosophy of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Policies Credential Stores Plugin framework Indexing Supported protocols and client applications Modes of operation Connecting to a server through One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Archive and backup concepts Maximizing the scope of auditing IPv6 in One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) SSH host keys Authenticating clients using public-key authentication in SSH The gateway authentication process Four-eyes authorization Network interfaces High Availability support in One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Versions and releases of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Accessing and configuring One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
The Welcome Wizard and the first login Basic settings
Supported web browsers and operating systems The structure of the web interface Network settings Configuring date and time System logging, SNMP and e-mail alerts Configuring system monitoring on SPS Data and configuration backups Archiving and cleanup Using plugins Forwarding data to third-party systems Joining to One Identity Starling
User management and access control Managing One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
Controlling One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS): reboot, shutdown Managing Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) clusters Managing a High Availability One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) cluster Upgrading One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Managing the One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) license Accessing the One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) console Sealed mode Out-of-band management of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Managing the certificates used on One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
General connection settings HTTP-specific settings ICA-specific settings MSSQL-specific settings RDP-specific settings SSH-specific settings Telnet-specific settings VMware Horizon View connections VNC-specific settings Indexing audit trails Using the Search interface Advanced authentication and authorization techniques Reports The One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) RPC API The One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) REST API One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) scenarios Troubleshooting One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Using SPS with SPP Configuring external devices Using SCP with agent-forwarding Security checklist for configuring One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Jumplists for in-product help Configuring SPS to use an LDAP backend Glossary

Manually adding the host key of a server

The following describes how to add the host key manually.

To add the host key manually

  1. Navigate to the SSH Control > Server Host Keys and click Create new.

    Figure 210: SSH Control > Server Host Keys — Create new

  2. Enter the IP address and port of the server into the Address and Port fields.

    You can use IPv4 and IPv6 addresses as well.

    Figure 211: SSH Control > Server Host Keys — Example of active Query fields

  3. Once you fill out the Address and Port fields, the Query... fields become active and you can query the public part of the host key of the server.

    SPS allows you to use the following SSH host keys:

    • RSA (ssh-rsa), which is the most widely used public-key algorithm for the SSH key. In SPS, uploading RSA SSH host keys are supported in PKCS #1 PEM, PKCS #8 PEM, OpenSSH (openssh-key-v1), and PuTTY private key formats.

      NOTE:

      One Identity recommends using 2048-bit RSA keys (or stronger).

    • Ed25519 (ssh-ed25519), which offers a better security and faster performance compared to RSA.

      In SPS, uploading Ed25519 SSH host keys are supported in PKCS #8 PEM, OpenSSH (openssh-key-v1), and PuTTY private key formats.

    • ECDSA NIST P-256 (ecdsa-sha2-nistp256), which is a variant of the Digital Signature Algorithm (DSA). In SPS, uploading ECDSA SSH host keys are supported in SEC1 PEM, PKCS #8 PEM, OpenSSH (openssh-key-v1), and PuTTY private key formats.

    You can have multiple SSH server host keys on SPS for the same server, however, you cannot set more than one key for each type. For example, you can keep your old RSA SSH key and generate a new Ed25519 key but you cannot set two RSA keys.

    Alternatively, paste the public part of the host key of the server.

  4. Click Save.

Creating and editing protocol-level SSH settings

SSH settings determine the parameters of the connection on the protocol level. For example, when the server-side connection is built, the timeout value, and greeting message of the connection. The following parameters determine which algorithms are used in the connections, and can be set independently for the client and the server side: key exchange, host key, cipher, MAC, and compression algorithms.

Caution:

Before modifying any of the algorithm settings, check whether the default algorithms are supported by your SSH client and server.

If yes, then you can leave these settings untouched.

If not and you need to amend the default algorithm settings, ensure that the client and server sides are harmonized. You can either do that in One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) or on the client/server itself.

Note that modifying algorithm settings in SPS is recommended to advanced users only. If you are unsure about which settings to amend, then contact our Support Team for assistance.

Figure 212: SSH Control > Settings — SSH settings

To create a new SSH settings profile or edit an existing one

  1. Navigate to the SSH Control > Settings and click to create an SSH setting profile. Enter a name for the profile (for example strongencryption).

  2. Click to display the parameters of the SSH connection.

  3. Network idle timeout: Connection timeout value in seconds. To avoid early timeout, set it to a larger value, for example a week (604800 seconds).

    Even if the user is not active, the session can contain activity that must be audited (for example, the output of a script). The idle timeout period will start only after this activity has stopped.

    Caution:

    Determining if a connection is idle is based on the network traffic generated by the connection, not the activity of the user. For example, if an application or the taskbar of a graphical desktop displays the time which is updated every minute, it generates network traffic every minute, negating the effects of timeout values greater than one minute and preventing One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) from closing the connection.

  4. User idle timeout: If no user activity is detected, terminate the session after the configured time has passed since the last user activity.

    This can be useful if only user-generated network traffic is important in a session. By using this option, situations described in the caution of Network idle timeout (such as a taskbar clock keeping the network traffic open indefinitely) can be avoided. To enable user idle timeout, select Enable user idle timeout and enter a value that is greater than or equal to the value of Network idle timeout.

  5. To display a greeting message to the clients after connecting the server, enter the message into the Greeting field.

  6. To display a banner message to the clients before authentication (as specified in RFC 4252 — The Secure Shell (SSH) Authentication Protocol), enter the message into the Banner field. For example, this banner can inform the users that the connection is audited.

  7. Optional. You can specify additional text to append to the SSH protocol banner, for example to mask the OpenSSH version upon connection. Enter the text in the Software version field.

  8. If needed, modify the encryption parameters. SPS enforces policies on the various elements of the encrypted SSH communication, such as the MAC, key-exchange, and cipher algorithms that are permitted to be used. The parameters can be set separately for the client and for the server side. The attributes are comma-separated strings listing the enabled methods/algorithms, in the order of preference.

    For a complete list of the available parameters, see Supported encryption algorithms.

    NOTE:

    Do not use the CBC block cipher mode, or the diffie-hellman-group1-sha1 key exchange algorithm. For details, see "Supported encryption algorithms" in the Administration Guide.

  9. To check the protocol-level parameters of the connections very strictly, select the Strict mode option. This option is enabled by default. When this option is enabled:

    SPS will reject connections that use unrealistic parameters, for example:

    • The number of columns and rows of the terminal is bigger or equal than 512.

    • The size of the screen is greater than 8192 pixels in either directions.

    SPS will reject port-forwarding connections where the address in the port-forwarding request and the channel-opening request does not match.

    NOTE:

    Strict mode can interfere with certain client or server applications.

    NOTE:

    Strict mode is not working with the Windows 10 internal Bash/WSL feature, because it uses a very large terminal window size. Using Windows 10 internal Bash/WSL is not supported.

  10. Before establishing the server-side connection, SPS can evaluate the connection and channel policies to determine if the connection might be permitted at all, for example it is not denied by a Time Policy. To enable this function, select the Enable pre channel check option. That way SPS establishes the server-side connection only if the evaluated policies permit the client to access the server.

  11. Click Commit.

  12. Select this settings profile in the SSH settings field of your connections.

Supported encryption algorithms

The following tables contain all the encryption algorithms you can configure One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) to recognize. If you use a configuration that is only partially supported, SPS might ignore the connection without warning.

NOTE:

Do not use the CBC block cipher mode, or the diffie-hellman-group1-sha1 key exchange algorithm.

Key exchange algorithms

The default SPS configuration for both the client and the server is the following:

diffie-hellman-group-exchange-sha256,diffie-hellman-group-exchange-sha1,diffie-hellman-group14-sha1,diffie-hellman-group14-sha256,diffie-hellman-group15-sha512,diffie-hellman-group16-sha512,diffie-hellman-group17-sha512,diffie-hellman-group18-sha512

The following key exchange (KEX) algorithms are recognized:

Table 8: Key exchange (KEX) algorithms
Key exchange (KEX) Default Comment
diffie-hellman-group1-sha1 Not recommended
diffie-hellman-group14-sha1
diffie-hellman-group-exchange-sha1
diffie-hellman-group-exchange-sha256
diffie-hellman-group14-sha256 -
diffie-hellman-group15-sha512 -
diffie-hellman-group16-sha512 -
diffie-hellman-group17-sha512 -
diffie-hellman-group18-sha512 -

During an SSH session, SPS performs a key re-exchange after each gigabyte of transmitted data or after each hour of connection time, whichever comes sooner.

Cipher algorithms

The default SPS configuration for both the client and the server is the following:

aes128-ctr,aes192-ctr,aes256-ctr

The following cipher algorithms are recognized:

Table 9: Cipher algorithms
Cipher algorithm Default Comment
3des-cbc Not recommended
blowfish-cbc Not recommended
twofish256-cbc Not recommended
twofish-cbc Not recommended
twofish192-cbc Not recommended
twofish128-cbc Not recommended
aes256-cbc Not recommended
aes192-cbc Not recommended
aes128-cbc Not recommended
aes256-ctr
aes192-ctr
aes128-ctr
serpent256-cbc Not recommended
serpent192-cbc Not recommended
serpent128-cbc Not recommended
arcfour Not recommended
idea-cbc Not recommended
cast128-cbc Not recommended
none Means no cipher algorithm; not recommended
Message authentication code (MAC) algorithms

The default SPS configuration for both the client and the server is the following:

hmac-sha2-256,hmac-sha2-512

The following MAC algorithms are recognized:

Table 10: Message Authentication Code (MAC) algorithms
MAC Default
hmac-sha1
hmac-sha1-96
hmac-md5
hmac-md5-96
hmac-sha2-256
hmac-sha2-512
SSH compression algorithms

The default SPS configuration for both the client and the server is the following:

none

The following SSH compression algorithms are recognized:

Table 11: SSH compression algorithms
SSH compression algorithm Default Comment
zlib
none Means no compression
Host key algorithms

The default SPS configuration for both the client and the server is the following:

ecdsa-sha2-nistp256,ssh-ed25519,rsa-sha2-512,rsa-sha2-256,ssh-rsa

The following host key algorithms are recognized:

Table 12: Host key algorithms
Host key algorithms Default Comment
ecdsa-sha2-nistp256  
ssh-ed25519
rsa-sha2-512
rsa-sha2-256
ssh-rsa

Not recommended

NOTE: The ssh-rsa public key signature algorithm that depends on SHA-1 is not recommended and will be disabled.

Telnet-specific settings

The following sections describe configuration settings available only for the Telnet protocol. Use the following policies to control who, when, and how can access the Telnet connection. For a list of supported client applications, see Supported protocols and client applications.

  • Channel Policy: The Telnet protocol has only one channel type with no special configuration options. The available channel policy options are the following: Type, From, Target, Time policy, Four-eyes, Record audit trail, Gateway groups, Remote groups, and Content policy. For details on configuring these options, see Creating and editing channel policies.

  • TLS support: To enable TLS-encryption for your Telnet connections, see Enabling TLS-encryption for Telnet connections.

  • Authentication Policy: Authentication policies describe the authentication methods allowed in a connection. Different methods can be used for the client and server-side connections. For details, see Creating a new Telnet authentication policy.

  • Telnet settings: Telnet settings determine the parameters of the connection on the protocol level, including timeout value, and so on. For details, see Creating and editing protocol-level Telnet settings.

  • User lists in Channel Policies: User lists affect Telnet connections only when they are used together with Gateway Authentication. For details, see Configuring gateway authentication.

  • Content Policy: Content policies allow you to inspect the content of the connections for various text patterns, and perform an action if the pattern is found. For example, One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) can send an e-mail alert if a specific command is used in a Telnet terminal session. For details, see Creating a new content policy.

  • Authentication and Authorization plugin:

    One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) provides a plugin framework to integrate SPS to external systems to authenticate or authorize the user before authenticating on the target server. Such plugins can also be used to request additional information from the users, for example, to perform multi-factor authentication.

    For details, see Integrating external authentication and authorization systems.

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