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One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions 6.8.1 - Administration Guide

Preface Introduction The concepts of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
The philosophy of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Policies Credential Stores Plugin framework Indexing Supported protocols and client applications Modes of operation Connecting to a server through One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Archive and backup concepts Maximizing the scope of auditing IPv6 in One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) SSH host keys Authenticating clients using public-key authentication in SSH The gateway authentication process Four-eyes authorization Network interfaces High Availability support in One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Versions and releases of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Accessing and configuring One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
The Welcome Wizard and the first login Basic settings
Supported web browsers and operating systems The structure of the web interface Network settings Configuring date and time System logging, SNMP and e-mail alerts Configuring system monitoring on SPS Data and configuration backups Archiving and cleanup Using plugins Forwarding data to third-party systems Joining to One Identity Starling
User management and access control Managing One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
Controlling One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS): reboot, shutdown Managing Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) clusters Managing a High Availability One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) cluster Upgrading One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Managing the One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) license Accessing the One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) console Sealed mode Out-of-band management of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Managing the certificates used on One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
General connection settings HTTP-specific settings ICA-specific settings MSSQL-specific settings RDP-specific settings SSH-specific settings Telnet-specific settings VMware Horizon View connections VNC-specific settings Indexing audit trails Using the Search interface Advanced authentication and authorization techniques Reports The One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) RPC API The One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) REST API One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) scenarios Troubleshooting One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Using SPS with SPP Configuring external devices Using SCP with agent-forwarding Security checklist for configuring One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Jumplists for in-product help Configuring SPS to use an LDAP backend Glossary

Debug logs

To increase the log level of the non-connection-related events, for example, to add the commands executed by the One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) web interface to the logs, enable debug level logging at Basic Settings > Management > Verbose system logs > Enable.

These logs are accessible at /var/log/scb-<day>.

The debug logs are used for
  • Our Support Team uses this to investigate the reasons behind a web user interface-related issue.

The debug logs contain the following
  • Logs generated by the SPS web interface.

  • System daemon logs.

  • Logs of periodic cron jobs.

Connection logs

The connection logs contain all connection-related information of the past week, one file per day. A file contains all logs for all connections for a single day.

The logging level of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) can be set separately for every protocol. To change the verbosity level of SPS, navigate to <Protocol name> Control > Global Options.

These logs are accessible at /var/log/zorp-<protocol-name>-<day>.

NOTE:

The verbosity level ranges from 1 (no logging) to 10 (extremely detailed), with level 4 being the default normal level. To debug complex problems, you might have to increase the verbosity level to 7. Higher level is needed only in extreme cases.

Caution:

High verbosity levels generate very large amount of log messages and might result in a very high load on the machine.

For log levels 8-10, the logs contain highly sensitive data for all connections, as well as passwords and private keys in plain text format.

The connection logs are used for
  • Our Support Team uses this to investigate the reasons behind a failed connection.

The connection logs contain the following
  • Connection success/failure events

  • Other connection-related events

Core dump files

One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) automatically generates core dump files if an important software component (for example, Zorp) of the system crashes for some reason. These core dump files can be of great help to the One Identity Support Team to identify problems. When a core dump file is generated, the SPS administrator receives an alerting e-mail, and an SNMP trap is generated if alerting is properly configured (for details, see Configuring system monitoring on SPS and System logging, SNMP and e-mail alerts).

To list and download the generated core dump files, navigate to Basic Settings > Troubleshooting > Core files.

For details on core dump files, see: Gathering data about system problems.

The core dump files are used for
  • The One Identity Support Team uses this to investigate the reasons behind a system crash.

The core dump files contain the following
  • The recorded state of the working memory of a computer program at a specific time, generally when the program has crashed or otherwise terminated abnormally.

Maximizing the scope of auditing

In certain special scenarios, One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) may examine and audit network traffic with some limitations, depending on the configuration.

In the first scenario, your organization uses jump hosts to access remote servers or services. In this case, SPS ignores the connection between the target server and the remote server, as it does not go through SPS.

Figure 13: Connection to a remote server through a jump host

In the next scenario, a file operation is performed going from the target server to the client (for example, copying a file using SCP). In this case, the direction of the connection is switched, as compared to the initial client-to-server direction.

Figure 14: File operation in the "reverse" direction

In these scenarios, SPS may not:

  • Restrict channels allowed in the connection.

  • Audit file operations.

    When you wish to search for the audit files of these connections, there will be no results returned on the Search page.

  • Allow authentication on the remote server if the user authenticates to the target server using a Credential Store.

If you want all connections in these scenarios to be audited, make sure that you add a connection policy for:

  • The connection between the target server and any remote servers.

  • The connection going from the target server to the client.

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