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One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions 6.8.1 - Administration Guide

Preface Introduction The concepts of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
The philosophy of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Policies Credential Stores Plugin framework Indexing Supported protocols and client applications Modes of operation Connecting to a server through One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Archive and backup concepts Maximizing the scope of auditing IPv6 in One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) SSH host keys Authenticating clients using public-key authentication in SSH The gateway authentication process Four-eyes authorization Network interfaces High Availability support in One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Versions and releases of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Accessing and configuring One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
The Welcome Wizard and the first login Basic settings
Supported web browsers and operating systems The structure of the web interface Network settings Configuring date and time System logging, SNMP and e-mail alerts Configuring system monitoring on SPS Data and configuration backups Archiving and cleanup Using plugins Forwarding data to third-party systems Joining to One Identity Starling
User management and access control Managing One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
Controlling One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS): reboot, shutdown Managing Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) clusters Managing a High Availability One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) cluster Upgrading One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Managing the One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) license Accessing the One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) console Sealed mode Out-of-band management of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Managing the certificates used on One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
General connection settings HTTP-specific settings ICA-specific settings MSSQL-specific settings RDP-specific settings SSH-specific settings Telnet-specific settings VMware Horizon View connections VNC-specific settings Indexing audit trails Using the Search interface Advanced authentication and authorization techniques Reports The One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) RPC API The One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) REST API One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) scenarios Troubleshooting One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Using SPS with SPP Configuring external devices Using SCP with agent-forwarding Security checklist for configuring One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Jumplists for in-product help Configuring SPS to use an LDAP backend Glossary

Configuration synchronization and SSH keys

The only SSH keys present on Managed host nodes will always be the ones that have been recorded by the Central management node. This is because the SSH keys stored on the Central management node get synced to the Managed host nodes during configuration synchronization. This means that the SSH keys recorded on the Managed host nodes before they were joined to the cluster are overwritten by the keys stored on the Central management node.

The Central management node records new SSH keys in the following cases:

  • The Central management node is configured to Accept key for the first time, and a new key is automatically recorded when the Central management node interacts with a server for the first time.
  • A new key is recorded on the Central management node on the SSH Control > Server Host Keys page and this change is committed.

These are the keys that get synced to your Managed host nodes.

Using a configuration synchronization plugin

When synchronizing the central configuration across nodes, you may want to:

  • Keep certain parts in the configuration of individual nodes unchanged.

  • Customize certain parts of the central configuration to specific needs of individual nodes in the cluster (for example, your nodes may access external services through different network addresses).

You can achieve all of these by using a configuration synchronization plugin that contains transformations for the problematic parts. The plugin only runs on nodes that have the Managed host role.

Customizing certain parts or features of a node using a configuration synchronization plugin has the same limitations as configuring Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) through the REST API. In other words, whatever you can configure through the REST API, you can configure the exact same settings using the plugin. One notable difference between the REST API and the plugin is that using the REST API, you can only read certain types of data (such as keys and passwords), while using the configuration synchronization plugin, you can write these types of data as well.

For details on how to configure SPS using the REST API, see REST API Reference Guide.

Data structures in the plugin are represented as nested JSON objects. For object references, the plugin uses keys.

The plugin works with the following key parameters:

  • local_config: The current configuration of a Managed Host node (those parts that can be configured through the REST API).
  • merged_config: The configuration of the Central management node that is about to be synced to the Managed host node (those parts that can be configured through the REST API), with settings related to networking, local services, management, and the license of SPS whitelisted. These settings are never overwritten by configuration synchronization.
  • node_id: The unique ID of the Managed host node in the cluster (you can retrieve this identifier by querying the /api/cluster/nodes endpoint through the REST API).
  • plugin_config: The configuration of the plugin provided as free-form text. Specifying the configuration of the plugin is optional. It enables you to run configuration synchronization on each cluster with different parameters if you have multiple clusters.
Example: Customizing an IP address in a connection policy

For example, an RDP connection policy on a Managed host node specifies the following client and target addresses:

$ curl ... https://<url-of-Central-Management-node>/api/configuration/rdp/connections/<id-of-the-connection-policy>

{
    "body": {
        "network": {
            "clients": [
                "0.0.0.0/0"
                ],
            "ports": [
                3389
                ],
           "targets": [
               "10.30.255.28/24"
               ]
        },
    },
    ...
}

In the following example, an RDP connection policy is configured with the following details on the Central management node:

$ curl ... https://<url-of-Managed-Node>/api/configuration/rdp/connections/<id-of-the-connection-policy>

{
    "body": {
        "network": {
            "clients": [
                "0.0.0.0/0"
                ],
            "ports": [
                3389
                ],
           "targets": [
               "10.30.255.8/24"
               ]
        },
    },
    ...
}

To ensure that the details of the connection policy on the Managed host node are kept as-is after configuration synchronization, add the following lines to the plugin main.py file:

$ cat main.py
def merge(local_config: dict, merged_config: dict, node_id: str, plugin_config: str, **kwargs):
    merged_config['rdp']['connections'][<id-of-the-connection-policy>]['network']['targets'][0] = "10.30.255.8/24"
    return merged_config

Due to possible new (as yet undefined) parameters, it is good practice to close the parameter list of the merge function with **kwargs.

In case you need assistance with writing customized transformations, contact our Professional Services Team, and a One Identity Service Delivery Engineer will be able to help you.

NOTE: Configuration settings related to networking (Basic Settings > Network), local services (Basic Settings > Local Services), and the license of SPS (Basic Settings > System > License) are not overwritten on the nodes by configuration synchronization even if you are not using a plugin.

For the management of SPS (Basic Settings > Management), the following configuration settings are not overwritten:

  • Mail settings
  • System backup
  • SSL certificates
  • Change root password

To use a configuration synchronization plugin

  1. Upload a configuration synchronization plugin:

    1. Navigate to Basic Settings > Plugins.

    2. Browse for the file, and click Upload plugin.

      NOTE: It is not possible to upload or delete plugins if SPS is in Sealed mode.

  2. Enable the plugin:

    1. Navigate to Basic Settings > Cluster management > Configuration synchronization.

    2. Select the plugin you have uploaded.

      Figure 112: Basic Settings > Cluster management — Select configuration synchronization plugin

  3. (Optional) Once you selected the plugin, click Configure next to the plugin drop-down box to open the Plugin Configuration dialog.

    Enter the configuration of the plugin in the Configuration field. Specifying the configuration of the plugin enables you to run configuration synchronization on each cluster with different parameters if you have multiple clusters. Click Save to save your changes and return to the Cluster management window.

  4. Click Commit changes when finished.

You can also upload and enable the configuration synchronization plugin through the REST API. For details, see "Upload and enable a configuration synchronization plugin" in the REST API Reference Guide.

Monitoring the status of nodes in your cluster

This section describes how to monitor the status of nodes in your cluster.

To monitor the status of nodes in your cluster

  1. On the web interface of your Central management node, navigate to Basic Settings > Cluster management. This page displays all nodes of the cluster.

    Figure 113: Basic Settings > Cluster management — Monitoring the status of the cluster nodes

    The following status information is displayed for each node:

    • Status: Indicates whether any issues occurred during configuration synchronization. It has the following values:

      Table 6: Basic Settings > Cluster management — Status values in the Cluster nodes screen
      Value Description
      OK Configuration synchronization was successful, no issues occurred.
      ISSUES

      While synchronizing the configuration, some issue(s) occurred. If this happens, click ISSUES in the Status column to reveal more information about the detected problem.

      OFFLINE Status information was sent by the node longer than 60 seconds ago.
    • Last updated: Indicates the last time the configuration of the node was synchronized, in ISO 8601 format.
    • Last seen: Indicates the last time the node sent status information to the Central Management node, in ISO 8601 format.

    • Configuration status: Indicates the status of configuration synchronization. It has the following values:

      Table 7: Basic Settings > Cluster management — Configuration status values in the Cluster nodes screen
      Value Description
      UP-TO-DATE The node has fetched the latest configuration from the Central management node, and has applied it. It is in sync with the Central management node.
      PENDING There has been a configuration change on the Central management node, but the change has not yet been synchronized to the node.
      OUTDATED There has been some error on the node, therefore it is running an old configuration.
      NOT FETCHED The node has not fetched any configuration yet.

      N/A

      The node is the Central management node, so it is not fetching its configuration from any other node.

    You can monitor the status of your nodes through the REST API, too. For details, see "Query the status of all nodes in the cluster" in the REST API Reference Guide and "Query one particular node" in the REST API Reference Guide.

Updating the IP address of a node in a cluster

If the node that you joined to the cluster is a Managed host node, you can still change its IP address even after the join.

NOTE: This is not available for nodes that do not have the Managed host role assigned to them.

To update the IP address of a Managed host node that is already the member of a cluster

  1. On the web interface of your Central management node, navigate to Basic Settings > Cluster management.
  2. Click on the row of the node that node that you want to update.

    The node row is expanded, showing the node address and the available roles.

    Figure 114: Basic Settings > Cluster management — Update IP address of node

  3. In the IP Address field, update the IP address of the node.

    Caution:

    Ensure that you are making the change for the Managed Host node. Do not change the IP address of the Central Management node.

  4. Click Update.
  5. On the web interface of the node with the IP address to update, navigate to Basic Settings > Network > Interfaces.
  6. In the Address field, update the IP address of the node.

    Figure 115: Basic Settings > Network > Interfaces — Updating the IP address of your node

  7. Click Commit.
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