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One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions 6.8.1 - Administration Guide

Preface Introduction The concepts of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
The philosophy of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Policies Credential Stores Plugin framework Indexing Supported protocols and client applications Modes of operation Connecting to a server through One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Archive and backup concepts Maximizing the scope of auditing IPv6 in One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) SSH host keys Authenticating clients using public-key authentication in SSH The gateway authentication process Four-eyes authorization Network interfaces High Availability support in One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Versions and releases of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Accessing and configuring One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
The Welcome Wizard and the first login Basic settings
Supported web browsers and operating systems The structure of the web interface Network settings Configuring date and time System logging, SNMP and e-mail alerts Configuring system monitoring on SPS Data and configuration backups Archiving and cleanup Using plugins Forwarding data to third-party systems Joining to One Identity Starling
User management and access control Managing One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
Controlling One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS): reboot, shutdown Managing Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) clusters Managing a High Availability One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) cluster Upgrading One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Managing the One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) license Accessing the One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) console Sealed mode Out-of-band management of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Managing the certificates used on One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
General connection settings HTTP-specific settings ICA-specific settings MSSQL-specific settings RDP-specific settings SSH-specific settings Telnet-specific settings VMware Horizon View connections VNC-specific settings Indexing audit trails Using the Search interface Advanced authentication and authorization techniques Reports The One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) RPC API The One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) REST API One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) scenarios Troubleshooting One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Using SPS with SPP Configuring external devices Using SCP with agent-forwarding Security checklist for configuring One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Jumplists for in-product help Configuring SPS to use an LDAP backend Glossary

Configuring time policies

The time policy determines the timeframe when the users are permitted to access a particular channel. By default, there is no time-based restriction, all channels are available 7x24.

Figure 163: Policies > Time Policies — Configuring time policies

To create a time policy or edit an existing one

  1. Navigate to the Time Policies tab of the Policies menu item and click to create a new time policy. Enter a name for the policy (for example workhoursonly).

  2. Click to display the days of the week and the allowed intervals.

  3. Enter the intervals for each day when the users are allowed to access the connection. Use the hh:mm format (for example from 08:00 to 16:00).

  4. To add multiple intervals for a day, click .

  5. Click Commit.

  6. To actually restrict access to a connection or a channel based on the policy created in the previous steps:

    • Select this policy in the Time Policy field of the channel policy.

    • Click Commit.

Creating and editing user lists

User lists are white- or blacklists of usernames that allow fine-control over who can access a connection or a channel.

Caution:

User Lists are white- or blacklists of usernames that determine who can access the server remotely. However, this cannot prevent a user from accessing the server from a local terminal.

Figure 164: Policies > User Lists — Configuring user lists

To create a new user list or edit an existing one

  1. Navigate to the User Lists tab of the Policies menu and click to create a new user list. Enter a name for the list User List field (for example serveradmins).

    Caution:

    Usernames, the names of user lists, and the names of usergroups are case sensitive.

  2. Click to display the list of users.

  3. Select the default policy of the user list. Select Reject for a whitelist, that is, to allow access only to the members of the list. Select Accept for a blacklist, that is, to allow access to everyone except the members of the list.

  4. Click and enter a username into the displayed field. Repeat this step until all required usernames are listed.

    Caution:

    Usernames, the names of user lists, and the names of usergroups are case sensitive.

  5. Click Commit to save the list.

  6. To actually restrict access to a channel based on the user list created in the previous steps:

    • Navigate to the Channel Policies tab of the type of connection you want to control and click to display the details of the policy.

    • Click in the Group section to add a new group to the policy and enter the name of the group. Repeat this step to add other groups.

      Caution:

      Usernames, the names of user lists, and the names of usergroups are case sensitive.

      NOTE:

      When listing more groups, users of any of the listed groups can access the channel. For details, see Creating and editing channel policies.

      When listing both a whitelist and blacklist in the Group section and a username appears on both lists, the user will be able to access the channel.

    • Click Commit.

Authenticating users to an LDAP server

You can use the LDAP policy to set the details of the LDAP server you wish to use to:

  • authenticate gateway users (available in SSH and Telnet as Authentication Policy)

  • query gateway groups (available for RDP, Telnet, SSH, and ICA)

  • query remote groups (available for RDP, Telnet, SSH, ICA, and HTTP)

NOTE: This feature is not available for Virtual Network Computing (VNC) connections.

Prerequisites

Make sure that the response timeout of the LDAP/Active Directory server is at least 120 seconds.

NOTE:
  • In RDP (including RDG) connections, you can use the LDAP policy for group membership check only, you cannot use it as the authentication backend. However, you can use a trusted AD domain for authentication and LDAP for group membership check.

    In this case, LDAP will only use the username without the domain name to verify the group membership.

  • One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) treats user and group names in a case insensitive manner if the matching rule for the attribute in question is case insensitive in the LDAP database.

To configure an LDAP policy for a connection

  1. Navigate to Policies > LDAP Servers and click to create a new LDAP policy.

    Figure 165: Policies > LDAP Servers — Configuring LDAP Server policies

  2. Enter a name for the policy (for example ldapservers).

  3. Enter the IP address or hostname and port of the LDAP server into the Server Address field. If you want to encrypt the communication between SPS and the LDAP server, in case of TLS, enter 636 as the port number, or in case of STARTTLS, enter 389 as the port number.

    Use an IPv4 address.

    To add multiple servers, click and enter the address of the next server. If a server is unreachable, SPS will try to connect to the next server in the list in failover fashion.

    Caution:

    If you will use a TLS-encrypted with certificate verification to connect to the LDAP server, use the full domain name (for example ldap.example.com) in the Server Address field, otherwise the certificate verification might fail. The name of the LDAP server must appear in the Common Name of the certificate.

    When you configure the location of the LDAP server, that is, the IP address or hostname and the port number, you can use a Service record (SRV record), which is a type of information record in the DNS that maps the name of a service to the DNS name of the server. For example, enter _ldap._tcp.SITE_NAME._sites.dc._msdcs.DOMAIN.NAME in the Address field where you change the SITE_NAME and DOMAIN.NAME to your own site and domain name, then add the port number as required.

    In SPS, the lookup of the SRV record happens at LDAP service startup, reload, or restart.

    For more information on SRV records, see the relevant Microsoft documentation.

  4. Select the type of your LDAP server in the Type field. Select:

    • Active Directory to connect to Microsoft Active Directory servers.

      You can enable nested groups. Select Enable AD group membership check, then Enable nested groups.

      Caution:

      Nested groups can slow down the query and cause the connection to timeout if the LDAP tree is very large. In this case, disable the Enable nested groups option.

      To also check group membership based on group DNs in a user attribute, select Enable checking for group DNs in user objects and enter the name of the user attribute, for example, memberOf in the User attribute of group DNs field.

      Caution:

      Using this option significantly slows down log on to the SPS web interface if you have too many groups.

      Only use this option if you have an LDAP schema where the user groups can only be determined from a user attribute that contains the group DNs.

      To check for group membership based on user DNs in group attributes, use the Check the user DN in these groups options.

      For more information, see Active Directory LDAP backend.

    • POSIX to connect to servers that use the POSIX LDAP scheme.

      If your LDAP server uses a custom POSIX LDAP scheme, you might need to set which LDAP attributes store the username, or the attributes that set group memberships. For example, if your LDAP scheme does not use the uid attribute to store the usernames, set the Username (user ID) attribute name option.

      In addition to the primary group membership checking, you can allow checking for supplementary group memberships by selecting the Enable POSIX group membership check and specifying the POSIX group membership attribute name field.

      To also check group membership based on group DNs in a user attribute, select Enable checking for group DNs in user objects and enter the name of the user attribute, for example, memberOf in the User attribute of group DNs field and objectClass, for example, groupOfNames in the Group objectClass field.

      Caution:

      Using this option significantly slows down log on to the SPS web interface if you have too many groups.

      Only use this option if you have an LDAP schema where the user groups can only be determined from a user attribute that contains the group DNs.

      To check for group membership based on user DNs in group attributes, use the Check the user DN in these groups options.

      For more information, see POSIX LDAP backend.

      For an overview about LDAP user and group resolution in SPS, see Overview.

  5. In the User Base DN field, enter the name of the DN to be used as the base of queries regarding users (for example: OU=People,DC=demodomain,DC=exampleinc).

    NOTE:

    You must fill in this field. It is OK to use the same value for User Base DN and Group Base DN.

    However, note that specifying a sufficiently narrow base for the LDAP subtrees where users and groups are stored can speed up LDAP operations.

  6. In the Group Base DN field, enter the name of the DN to be used as the base of queries regarding groups (for example: OU=Groups,DC=demodomain,DC=exampleinc).

    NOTE:

    You must fill in this field. It is OK to use the same value for User Base DN and Group Base DN.

    However, note that specifying a sufficiently narrow base for the LDAP subtrees where users and groups are stored can speed up LDAP operations.

  7. In the Bind DN field, enter the Distinguished Name that SPS should use to bind to the LDAP directory (for example: CN=Administrator,DC=demodomain,DC=exampleinc).

    NOTE:

    SPS accepts both pre-win2000-style and Win2003-style account names (User Principal Names), for example administrator@example.com is also accepted.

  8. To configure or change the password to use when binding to the LDAP server, click Change and enter the password. Click Update. Click Commit.

    NOTE:

    One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) accepts passwords that are not longer than 150 characters. Unicode characters as well as the following special characters can be used: !"#$%&'()*+,-./:;<=>?@[\]^-`{|}

  1. Skip this step if you use passwords to authenticate the users.

    • If you use public-key authentication and receive the public key of the users from the LDAP database, enter the name of the LDAP attribute that stores the public keys of the users into the Publickey attribute name field. For details on using public-key authentication with the LDAP database, see Configuring public-key authentication on One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS).

    • If you use X.509 certificate for authentication and receive the certificates of the users from the LDAP database, enter the name of the LDAP attribute that stores the certificates of the users into the Certificate attribute name field.

  2. Skip this step if you use passwords to authenticate the users.

    • If you use public-key authentication and want SPS to generate server-side encryption keys on-the-fly and store them in a separate attribute on the LDAP server, enter the name of the attribute into the Generated publickey attribute name field.

    • If you use certificate authentication and want SPS to generate server-side certificates on-the-fly and store them in a separate attribute on the LDAP server, enter the name of the attribute into the Generated certificate attribute name field.

  1. If you want to encrypt the communication between SPS and the LDAP server, in Encryption, select the TLS or the STARTTLS option and complete the following steps:

    Figure 166: Policies > LDAP Servers — Configuring encryption

    NOTE:

    TLS-encrypted connection to Microsoft Active Directory is supported only on Windows 2003 Server and newer platforms. Windows 2000 Server is not supported.

    • If you want SPS to verify the certificate of the server, select Only accept certificates authenticated by the Trust Store and select a custom trust store with none certificate revocation check type in the Trust Store field.

      SPS will use the selected trust store to verify the certificate of the server, and reject the connections if the verification fails.

      Caution:

      According to recent cryptographic research, SHA-1 algorithm cannot be trusted as secure anymore, because signatures can be forged with reasonable costs. As a result, SHA-1 algorithm is not supported in SPS for X.509 certificate chains. Starting from SPS versions 6.0.4 and 6.5.0, certificates with SHA1-based signatures are no longer trusted for Active Directory or LDAP authentication, and future versions might refuse to validate SHA-1 signatures altogether.

      Note that Root CA certificates may still contain SHA-1 signatures, because the signature is not validated for self-signed certificates. It is expected that other software such as clients and servers connected to SPS might reject SHA-1 signatures in a similar fashion.

      Signing CAs in SPS generate certificates with SHA-256 since versions 4.3.4 and 5.0.0.

      SPS checks if the certificate revocation list (CRL) has expired and that the CRL has been signed by the same certificate authority (CA).

      Caution:

      If you will use a TLS-encrypted with certificate verification to connect to the LDAP server, use the full domain name (for example ldap.example.com) in the Server Address field, otherwise the certificate verification might fail. The name of the LDAP server must appear in the Common Name of the certificate.

    • If the LDAP server requires mutual authentication, that is, it expects a certificate from SPS, enable Authenticate as client. Generate and sign a certificate for SPS, then click in the Client X.509 certificate field to upload the certificate. After that, click in the Client key field and upload the private key corresponding to the certificate.

    One Identity recommends using 2048-bit RSA keys (or stronger).

  1. To commit the changes, click Commit.

  2. Click Test to test the connection.

    NOTE:

    Testing TLS and STARTTLS-encrypted connections is not supported.

Audit policies

An audit trail is a file storing the recorded activities of the administrators. Audit trails are not created automatically for every connection: auditing must be enabled manually in the channel policy used in the connection. The available default channel policies enable auditing for the most common channels. Audit trails are automatically compressed, and can be encrypted, timestamped, and signed as well. Audit trails can be replayed using the Safeguard Desktop Player application (for details, see Safeguard Desktop Player User Guide), or directly in your browser (for details, see Replaying audit trails in your browser).

TIP: By default, every connection uses the built-in default audit policy. Unless you use a custom audit policy, modifying the default audit policy will affect every audited channel of the connections passing through One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS).

Caution:

In RDP connections, if the client uses the Windows login screen to authenticate on the server, the password of the client is visible in the audit trail. To avoid displaying the password when replaying the audit trail, you are recommended to encrypt the upstream traffic in the audit trail using a separate certificate from the downstream traffic. For details, see "Encrypting audit trails" in the Administration Guide.

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