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One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions 6.8.1 - Administration Guide

Preface Introduction The concepts of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
The philosophy of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Policies Credential Stores Plugin framework Indexing Supported protocols and client applications Modes of operation Connecting to a server through One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Archive and backup concepts Maximizing the scope of auditing IPv6 in One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) SSH host keys Authenticating clients using public-key authentication in SSH The gateway authentication process Four-eyes authorization Network interfaces High Availability support in One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Versions and releases of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Accessing and configuring One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
The Welcome Wizard and the first login Basic settings
Supported web browsers and operating systems The structure of the web interface Network settings Configuring date and time System logging, SNMP and e-mail alerts Configuring system monitoring on SPS Data and configuration backups Archiving and cleanup Using plugins Forwarding data to third-party systems Joining to One Identity Starling
User management and access control Managing One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
Controlling One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS): reboot, shutdown Managing Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) clusters Managing a High Availability One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) cluster Upgrading One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Managing the One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) license Accessing the One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) console Sealed mode Out-of-band management of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Managing the certificates used on One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
General connection settings HTTP-specific settings ICA-specific settings MSSQL-specific settings RDP-specific settings SSH-specific settings Telnet-specific settings VMware Horizon View connections VNC-specific settings Indexing audit trails Using the Search interface Advanced authentication and authorization techniques Reports The One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) RPC API The One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) REST API One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) scenarios Troubleshooting One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Using SPS with SPP Configuring external devices Using SCP with agent-forwarding Security checklist for configuring One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Jumplists for in-product help Configuring SPS to use an LDAP backend Glossary

Session-handling in HTTP

Communication over HTTP consists of client requests and server responses (also called exchanges). Unlike in other protocols, for example SSH, these request-response pairs do not form a well-defined, continuous connection. Therefore, One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) assumes that an HTTP request-response pair belongs to a specific session if the following points are true:

  • The IP address of the client is the same

  • The hostname of the target server (not the IP address) is the same

  • The username is the same (if the user has performed inband authentication)

  • The time elapsed since the last request-response pair between the same client and server is less then the session timeout value (15 minutes by default).

  • The first session cookie SPS finds within the request is the same. Note that the cookie must be listed in the Session Cookie Settings option. For details, see Creating and editing protocol-level HTTP settings.

SPS creates a separate audit trail and records the accessed URLs for every session. These are displayed on the Search page. If any of the columns is not visible, click Customize columns....

For technical reasons, in authenticated sessions the login page where the user provides the credentials is not part of the session associated with the username. This means that even if the login page is the first that the user visits, SPS will record two sessions: the first does not include a username, the second one does. These two sessions are visible on the Active Connections page (until the unauthenticated session times out).

Creating and editing protocol-level HTTP settings

HTTP settings determine the parameters of the connection on the protocol level, including timeout value, and so on.

Caution:

Modifying timeout settings is recommended only to advanced users. Do not modify these settings unless you exactly know what you are doing.

To create a new HTTP settings profile or edit an existing one

  1. Navigate to the Settings tab of the HTTP Control menu item and click to create a HTTP setting profile. Enter a name for the profile (for example http_special).

    Figure 189: HTTP Control > Settings — Creating and editing protocol-level HTTP settings

  2. Click to display the parameters of the profile.

  3. Modify the parameters as needed. The following parameters are available:

    • Idle timeout: Timeout value for the session in seconds. To avoid early timeout, set it to a larger value, for example a week (604800 seconds).

      Caution:

      Determining if a connection is idle is based on the network traffic generated by the connection, not the activity of the user. For example, if an application or the taskbar of a graphical desktop displays the time which is updated every minute, it generates network traffic every minute, negating the effects of timeout values greater than one minute and preventing One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) from closing the connection.

    • Session timeout: Timeout value for the session in seconds.

    • Enable pre channel check: Select this option to evaluate the connection and channel policies before establishing the server-side connection. That way if the connection is not permitted at all, SPS does not establish the server-side connection.

      NOTE:

      This option cannot be disabled.

  4. To distinguish the audited HTTP requests and responses based on the session cookies of web applications, click Session Cookie Settings > , and enter the name of the session cookie, for example, PHPSESSID, JSESSIONID, or ASP.NET_SessionId. Note that the names of session cookies are case sensitive.

    Repeat this step to add multiple cookie names. Note that if you list multiple cookie names, SPS will use the first one it finds to assign the requests to a session.

  5. To configure TLS security settings on both the Client side and the Server side, proceed to TLS security settings.

    Figure 190: <Protocol> Control > Settings > TLS security settings - configuring TLS security settings

    • Cipher strength specifies the cipher string OpenSSL will use. The following settings options are possible:

      • Recommended: this setting only uses ciphers with adequate security level.

      • Custom: this setting allows you to specify the list of ciphers you want to permit SPS to use in the connection. This setting is only recommended in order to ensure compatibility with older systems. For more details on customizing this list, check the 'openssl-ciphers' manual page on your SPS appliance.

        For example: ALL:!aNULL:@STRENGTH

    • Minimum TLS version specifies the minimal TLS version SPS will offer during negotiation. The following settings options are possible:

      • TLS 1.2: this setting will only offer TLS version 1.2 during negotiation. This is the recommended setting.

      • TLS 1.1: this setting will offer TLS version 1.1 and later versions during negotiation.

      • TLS 1.0: this setting will offer TLS version 1.0 and later versions during negotiation.

    NOTE:

    Note that SPS only permits TLS-encrypted connections. SSLv3 is not supported.

  6. Click Commit.

  7. Select this settings profile in the HTTP settings field of your connections.

ICA-specific settings

The following sections describe configuration settings available only for the ICA protocol. Use the following policies to control who, when, and how can access the ICA connection.

NOTE:

As an experimental feature, IPv6 addresses can be configured for ICA connections.

Setting up ICA connections

This section focuses on describing the ICA-specific details of connection configuration. For a detailed description on configuring connections, see General connection settings.

Caution:

If the clients are accessing a remote application or desktop that is shared for Anonymous users (that is, the Users properties of the application is set to Allow anonymous users in the Citrix Delivery Services Console), the actual remote session will be running under an Anonymous account name (for example, Anon001, Anon002, and so on), not under the username used to access the remote server. Therefore, you need to enable usermapping to the Anon* usernames.

To accomplish this, create a usermapping policy and set the Username on the server option to Anon*, and the Groups option to *, then use this usermapping policy in your ICA connections. For details on using usermapping policies, see Configuring usermapping policies.

Reliable connection is also known as Common Gateway Protocol (CGP). It attempts to reconnect to the server in case of a network failure. To use this feature, enable Reliable and enter the default port in the Port field in the upper right corner.

Enable Act as SOCKS proxy to configure the client to use One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) as a SOCKS proxy. If you have enabled this option, you can select Inband destination selection as Target. Enter the IP address or the IP address/Prefix of the brokers (Citrix XML Brokers) used by the client in this connection policy into the Address field. It is also recommended to enable access to the brokers on port 443, as the clients usually try to access the broker using this port first. Disabling port 443 will cause a denied connection to appear on the SPS Search interface for every connection attempt (but the clients will be able to connect the server).

Caution:

SPS does not audit or monitor the traffic between the brokers and the clients in any way, and are not listed on the SPS search interface. Only the connections between the clients and the actual servers are audited.

Caution:

If SPS is acting as a SOCKS proxy and a client attempts to access a server that it is not permitted to access according to the configuration of SPS, SPS will deny the connection. However, the Citrix client application will automatically attempt to connect the server directly without using a proxy and will succeed if the server is directly accessible from the client. Ensure that your firewalls are configured properly to prevent such connections, as these direct connections cannot be audited by SPS.

NOTE:

When enabling Reliable connection or Act as SOCKS proxy the first time, a warning is displayed suggesting the default port to be used based on the specific settings. Also, read the tooltips on these options as they contain up-to-date information about the default port numbers.

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