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One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Passwords 2.4 - Administration Guide

Introduction System requirements Installing the One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Passwords desktop client Setting up Safeguard for Privileged Passwords for the first time Getting acquainted with the console Privileged access requests Toolbox Accounts Account Groups Assets Asset Groups Directories Entitlements Partitions Settings
Access Request settings Appliance settings Asset Management settings Backup and Retention settings Certificate settings Cluster settings External Integration settings Messaging settings Profile settings Access settings Sessions settings
Users User Groups Disaster recovery Administrator permissions Preparing systems for management Troubleshooting Frequently asked questions
How do I access the API How do I audit transaction activity How do I configure external federation authentication How do I manage accounts on unsupported platforms How do I modify the appliance configuration settings How do I prevent Safeguard for Privileged Passwords messages when making RDP connections How do I see which assets and/or accounts are governed by a profile How do I set the appliance system time How do I setup discovery jobs How do Safeguard for Privileged Passwords database servers use SSL What are the access request states What do I do when an appliance goes into quarantine What is required for One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Passwords Privileged Sessions What is required to integrate with Starling Identity Analytics & Risk Intelligence What needs to be set up to use Application to Application What role-based email notifications are generated by default When does the rules engine run for dynamic grouping and tagging Why did the password change during an open request Why join Safeguard for Privileged Passwords to One Identity Starling
Safeguard Desktop Player Appendix: Safeguard ports

Account discovery job workflow

Safeguard for Privileged Passwords's account discovery jobs run automatically against the assets that are in the scope of a partition profile. For more information, see About profiles.

Note:

Safeguard for Privileged Passwords supports account discovery on the following platforms:

  • AIX
  • HP-UX
  • Linux
  • MAC OS X
  • Solaris
  • Windows

To configure and schedule rules that perform discovery jobs

  1. Create a partition. For more information, see Adding a partition or Adding a directory.
  2. Create an account discovery job. For more information, see Account Discovery.
  3. Create a profile. (For more information, see Creating a partition profile or Creating a directory profile.

    Note: All profiles run the configured account discovery jobs on the assets that are assigned to the scope of the profile, according to the account discovery setting's schedule.

  4. After the account discovery job runs, open the partition's Discovered Accounts tab to mark the accounts:
    1. Click (or tap)  Ignore to prevent Safeguard for Privileged Passwords from managing the selected account.
    2. Click (or tap)  Manage to add the selected account to the selected partition and assign it to the scope of the default profile.

    Note: The discovery job finds all accounts that match the discovery rule's criteria regardless of whether it has been marked Ignore or Manage in the past.

  5. Search the Activity Center for information about discovery jobs that have run. Safeguard for Privileged Passwords lists the account discovery events in the Account Discovery Activity category.

Directory account discovery job workflow

Safeguard for Privileged Passwords's directory account discovery jobs run automatically each time it synchronizes the directory. You can view or modify the Synchronization Interval on the directory's General tab.

To configure directory account discovery jobs

  1. Create a directory account discovery job. For more information, see Managing directory account discovery jobs.
  2. After the directory account discovery job runs, open the directory's Discovered Accounts tab to mark the accounts:
    1. Click (or tap)  Ignore to prevent Safeguard for Privileged Passwords from managing the selected directory account.
    2. Click (or tap)  Manage to add the selected account to the selected directory and assign it to the scope of the default profile.

      Note: The discovery job finds all accounts that match the discovery rule's criteria regardless of whether it has been marked Ignore or Manage in the past.

  3. Search the Activity Center for information about discovery jobs that have run. Safeguard for Privileged Passwords lists the directory account discovery events in the Account Discovery Activity category.

How do Safeguard for Privileged Passwords database servers use SSL

Some database servers use Secure Socket Layer (SSL) when communicating with Safeguard for Privileged Passwords. Depending on the platform type, version, and configuration, the database server can either use SSL for only encrypting the session or it can use SSL for encrypting and verifying the authenticity of the database server.

ODBC Transport

The following platforms use the ODBC transport. Safeguard for Privileged Passwords installs the appropriate software driver on the appliance to communicate with the platform. The configuration data that Safeguard for Privileged Passwords uses to initialize a connection with the server is in the form of a connection string consisting of a colon-separated list of driver-specific options.

By default, the database servers encrypt the login data, but not the subsequent data passed on the connection. You must configure SSL and enable it on the database server to enable encryption for the session data.

Microsoft SQL Server

Microsoft SQL Server is always capable of encrypting the connection with SSL. It listens on a single port for both SSL and non-SSL connections.

If you have set the Force Encryption option to yes on the SQL server, then it uses SSL to encrypt the data, regardless of whether the Safeguard for Privileged Passwords client requests it or not.

You can set the Force Encryption option to yes on the SQL server without configuring a server certificate. In this case, the SQL server transparently generates a self-signed certificate to use when a Safeguard for Privileged Passwords client requests encryption. This makes it possible for the SQL server to use SSL only to provide encryption for the session without verifying the server certificate.

Note: It is not possible from within a running session to detect whether the SQL server is using SSL for encryption.

Table 275: SQL Server SSL Support
Safeguard for Privileged Passwords Client Options Microsoft SQL Server Configuration

 

Result

Use SSL Encryption Verify SSL Cert Force Encryption Server Cert Configured
No n/a No n/a The SQL Server does not encrypt the session.
Yes No n/a No Safeguard for Privileged Passwords requests that the SQL server encrypt the session using a generated self-signed certificate.
Yes No n/a Yes Safeguard for Privileged Passwords requests that the SQL server encrypt the session using the server certificate.
Yes Yes n/a No The SQL server rejects the connection as there is no certificate to verify against.
Yes Yes n/a Yes Safeguard for Privileged Passwords requests that the SQL server encrypt the session and verify the server certificate against the trusted CA certificates in Safeguard for Privileged Passwords.

MySQL Server

To support SSL you must compile the MySQL server software with SSL support and correctly configure it with a CA certificate and server certificate. If there is any problem with the certificate, the MySQL server may log an error and start up without SSL support. In this case the MySQL server rejects the request to enable SSL for a session as there is no certificate to verify against and does not encrypt the session. The MySQL server listens on a single port for both types of connections.

The behavior of the MySQL server depends on the server version and configuration. In some versions of MySQL, the server enables SSL by default on all Safeguard for Privileged Passwords client sessions once it is configured.

If the MySQL server defaults to using SSL, or requires SSL for a user, the MySQL server encrypts the session even if the Safeguard for Privileged Passwords client does not request it. However, the Safeguard for Privileged Passwords client cannot request to use SSL just for encryption; it can only request SSL if you have imported the correct CA certificate to Safeguard for Privileged Passwords.

Note: It is possible to detect that SSL is in use from within a session by examining the session variables. That is, the Safeguard for Privileged Passwords client can detect if a request to use SSL has not been honored and displays an error.

Table 276: MySQL Server SSL Support
Safeguard for Privileged Passwords Use SSL Encryption Option SSL Suppofrted on MySQL Server

Result

No No Unencrypted session.
No Yes Determined by the MySQL server. The server encrypts the session if it defaults to using SSL or requires it for this user.
Yes No Safeguard for Privileged Passwords client detects this and reports a failure.
Yes Yes Safeguard for Privileged Passwords requests that the MySQL server encrypt the session and verity the server certificate against the trusted CA certificate in Safeguard for Privileged Passwords

Sybase ASE Server

To support SSL you must correctly configure the Sybase server with a CA certificate and server certificate. The Sybase server listens on different ports for SSL and non-SSL connections, and rejects a mismatched request from a Safeguard for Privileged Passwords client to a particular port.

The Safeguard for Privileged Passwords client cannot request to use SSL just for encryption; it can only request SSL if you have imported the correct CA certificate to Safeguard for Privileged Passwords.

Table 277: MySQL Server SSL Support
Safeguard for Privileged Passwords Use SSL Encryption Option Sybase Server Listening Port uses SSL

 

Result

No No Unencrypted session.
No Yes

The Sybase server rejects the connection attempt.

NOTE: The ODBC driver cannot detect that this is an SSL error and displays a ‘client cannot connect’ error.

Yes No The Sybase server rejects the session with an SSL error.
Yes Yes Safeguard for Privileged Passwords requests that the Sybase server encrypt the session and verify the server certificate against the trusted CA certificates in Safeguard for Privileged Passwords.

What are the access request states

Safeguard for Privileged Passwords uses the following access request states, which change as a request steps through the workflow process.

Table 278: Access request states
State Description
Available Approved requests that are ready for the requester. That is, for password release requests, the requester can view or copy the password. For session access requests, the requester can launch the session.
Approved Requests that have been approved, but the checkout time has not arrived.
Denied Requests denied by the approver.
Expired Requests for which the checkout duration has elapsed.
Pending Requests that are waiting for approval.
Revoked

Approved requests retracted by the approver.

NOTE: The approver can revoke a request between the time the requester views it and checks it back in.

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