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Safeguard Authentication Services 4.1.5 - Installation Guide

One Identity Privileged Access Suite for Unix Introducing One Identity Authentication Services Installing and configuring Authentication Services Installing and joining from the Unix command line Getting started with Authentication Services Troubleshooting Enterprise package deployment

Installation using msiexec.exe

You can install specific Authentication Services components from the Windows command line using Msiexec.exe, the Microsoft Windows Installer program, which processes product installation files in the .MSI format. You can either double-click the individual Authentication Services component .msi files or you can run msiexec.exe to install, modify, and perform other operations from the Windows command line.

The individual Authentication Services component .msi files, located on the distribution media in the windows folder, are:

  • aducX64.msi - Installs the Active Directory Users and Computers Unix extensions for user and group management on a Windows 64-bit platforms
  • aducX86.mis - Installs the Active Directory Users and Computers Unix extensions for user and group management on a Windows 32-bit platforms
  • cc.msi - Installs the Control Center extension
  • corX64.msi - Installs the core packages on a Windows 64-bit platform.
  • coreX86.msi - Installs the core packages on a Windows 32-bit platform.
  • doc.msi - Installs the User Documentation
  • GpSettingsX86 - Installs the Authentication Services Group Policy settings reporting library used by third parties such as Change Auditor and Group Policy Manager to report on Group Policy settings.
  • gpX64.msi - Installs the Group Policy extension on a Windows 64-bit platforms
  • gpX86.msi - Installs the Group Policy extension on a Windows 32-bit platforms

You can use the following properties on the command line when installing the individual Authentication Services components:

Table 10: MSI properties
MSI Property Description
INSTALLFOLDER Specifies the directory where you want to install the package. (Core X86 only.)

Default: %PROGRAMFILES(X86)%\Quest Software\Authentication Services

INSTALLDESKTOPSHORTCUTS Specifies whether or not to install desktop shortcuts.

Default: 0 (Do not install desktop shortcuts)

INSTALLSTARTMENUSHORTCUTS Specifies whether or not to install Start menu shortcuts.

Default: 0 (Do not install Start menu shortcuts)

ARPSYSTEMCOMPONENT Specifies whether or not to add an entry in the Uninstall or change a program interface (Add/Remove Programs) for each individual component (ADUC, Group Policy, Control Center and Docs).

Default: 0 (Add entry in Add/Remove Programs.)

NOCHANGEPSPOLICY Specifies whether or not to allow PowerShell execution policy modifications. (Core X86 only.)

Default: 0 (Allow PowerShell policy modifications)

The following procedures show examples of using the MSI Properties from the Windows command line.

To install Authentication Services Windows components using Msiexec.exe

  1. To install the Control Center, enter the following:
    msiexec /i cc.msi

    Note: Run msiexec -help to see the full command syntax.

  2. To specify the install directory path for the core packages, enter:
    msiexec INSTALLFOLDER=%SystemDrive%:\<Directory> /i coreX86.msi

    Note: By default, the installation directory is:

    • On Windows 64-bit platforms:
      %SystemDrive%:\Program Files\Quest Software\Authentication Services
    • On Windows 32-bit platforms:
      %SystemDrive%:\Program Files (x86)\Quest Software\Authentication Services

  3. To install the Control Center and create a Desktop icon for it, enter:
    msiexec INSTALLDESKTOPSHORTCUTS=1 /i cc.msi
  4. To install the Control Center and create a Start menu shortcut for it, enter:
    msiexec INSTALLSTARTMENUSHORTCUTS=1 /i cc.msi
  5. To install the ADUC extensions and add a separate entry in the Uninstall or change a program interface for it, enter:
    msiexec ARPSYSTEMCOMPONET=0 /i aducX64.msi

    Note: Setting ARPSYSTEMCOMPONET to 1 prevents the application from displaying in the Uninstall or change a program interface (Add/Remove Programs).

  6. You can apply several MSI properties simultaneously, as in the following example:
    Msiexec.exe INSTALLFOLDER=C:\foo INSTALLDESKTOPSHORTCUTS=1 INSTALLSTARTMENUSHORTCUTS=0 ARPSYSTEMCOMPONENT=1 NOCHANGEPSPOLICY=1 /i corex86.msi

    If you run this command line, the Core X86 package will be installed into C:\foo, icons will be added to the Desktop, but no Start menu shortcut will be added. Furthermore, this package will not be listed in the Uninstall or change a program interface (Add/Remove Programs) and the PowerShell Execution Policy will not be updated.

To uninstall Authentication Services components from the Windows command line

  1. To uninstall the Control Center, enter the following:
    msiexec /uninstall cc.msi

    Notes:

    You can specify either /uninstall or /x.

    If you manually install MSI files, take care to uninstall them in the reverse order that they are installed. For example if you install CoreX86 and AducExtensionsx86 remove them in this order: AducExtensionsx86, then Corex86.

Configure Active Directory for Authentication Services

To utilize full Active Directory functionality, when you install Authentication Services in your environment, One Identity recommends that you prepare Active Directory to store the configuration settings that it uses. Authentication Services adds the Unix properties of Active Directory users and groups to Active Directory and allows you to map a Unix user to an Active Directory user. This is a one-time process that creates the Authentication Services application configuration in your forest.

Note: To use the Authentication Services Active Directory Configuration Wizard, you must have rights to create and delete all child objects in the Active Directory container.

If you do not configure Active Directory for Authentication Services, you can run your Authentication Services client agent in "Version 3 Compatibility Mode" which allows you to join a host to an Active Directory domain.

(For more information, see Version 3 compatibility mode.)

When running Authentication Services client agent in "Version 3 Compatibility Mode", you have the option in One Identity Management Console for Unix to set the schema configuration to use Windows 2003 R2. (See Configure Windows 2003 R2 Schema in the mangement console online Help for details.) The Windows 2003 R2 schema option extends the schema to support the direct look up of Unix identities in Active Directory domain servers.

You can also create the Authentication Services application configuration from the Unix command line, if you prefer. For more information, see Creating the application configuration from the Unix command line.

Configuring Active Directory for Authentication Services

The first time you install Authentication Services in your environment, One Identity recommends that you perform this one-time Active Directory configuration step to utilize full Authentication Services 4.1 functionality.

Note: If you do not configure Active Directory for Authentication Services, you can run your Authentication Services client agent in "Version 3 Compatibility Mode" which allows you to join a host to an Active Directory domain.

(For more information, see Version 3 compatibility mode.)

To configure Active Directory for Authentication Services

  1. At the Authentication Services Active Directory Configuration Wizard Welcome dialog, click Next.
  2. At the Connect to Active Directory dialog:
    1. Provide Active Directory login credentials for the wizard to use for this task:
      • Select Use my current AD logon credentials if you are a user with permission to create a container in Active Directory.
      • Select Use different AD logon credentials to specify the Active Directory credentials of another user, enter the User name and Password.

      Note: The wizard does not save these credentials; it only uses them for this setup task.

    2. Indicate how you want to connect to Active Directory:

      Select whether to connect to an Active Directory Domain Controller or One Identity Active Roles Server.

      Note: If you have not installed the One Identity Active Roles Server MMC Console on your computer, the ActiveRoles Server option is not available.

    3. Optionally enter the Domain or domain controller and click Next.
  3. At the License Authentication Services dialog, browse to select your license file and click Next.

    Refer to Licensing Authentication Services for more information about licensing requirements.

    Note: You can add additional licenses later from the Authentication Services Control Center Preferences Licensing dialog.

  4. At the Configure Settings in Active Directory dialog, accept the default location in which to store the configuration or browse to select the Active Directory location where you want to create the container and click Setup.

    Note: You must have rights to create and delete all child objects in the selected location. For more information on the structure and rights required see Windows permissions.

  5. Once you have configured Active Directory for Authentication Services, click Close.

    The Control Center opens. You are now ready to configure your Unix Agent Components.

    (Proceed to Configure Unix agent components)

About Active Directory configuration

The first time you install or upgrade the Authentication Services 4.1 Windows components in your environment, One Identity recommends that you configure Active Directory for Authentication Services to utilize full functionality. This is a one-time Active Directory configuration step that creates the application configuration in your forest. Authentication Services uses the information found in the application configuration to maintain consistency across the enterprise. Without the application configuration, store UNIX attributes in the RFC2307 standard attributes to achieve the most functionality.

Note: If you do not configure Active Directory for Authentication Services, you can run your client agent in "Version 3 Compatibility Mode" which allows you to join a host to an Active Directory domain.

(For more information, see Version 3 compatibility mode.)

The Authentication Services application configuration stores the following information in Active Directory:

  • Application Licenses
  • Settings controlling default values and behavior for Unix-enabled users and groups
  • Schema configuration

The Unix agents use the Active Directory configuration to validate license information and determine schema mappings. Windows management tools read this information to determine the schema mappings and the default values it uses when Unix-enabling new users and groups.

The Authentication Services application configuration information is stored inside a container object with the specific naming of: cn={786E0064-A470-46B9-83FB-C7539C9FA27C}. The default location for this container is cn=Program Data,cn=Quest Software,cn=Authentication Services,dc=<your domain>. This location is configurable.

There can only be one Active Directory configuration per forest. If Authentication Services finds multiple configurations, it uses the one created first as determined by reading the whenCreated attribute. The only time this would be a problem is if different groups are using different schema mappings for Unix attributes in Active Directory. In that case, standardize on one schema and use local override files to resolve conflicts. You can use the Set-QasUnixUser and Set-QasUnixGroup PowerShell commands to migrate Unix attributes from one schema configuration to another. Refer to the PowerShell help for more information.

The first time you run the Control Center, the Authentication Services Active Directory Configuration Wizard walks you through the setup.

Note: You can also create the Authentication Services application configuration from the Unix command line, if you prefer.

For more information, see Creating the application configuration from the Unix command line.

You can modify the settings using the Authentication Services Control Center Preferences. To change Active Directory configuration settings, you must have rights to Create Child Object (container) and Write Attribute for cn, displayName, description, showInAdvancedViewOnly for the Active Directory configuration root container and all child objects.

In order for Unix clients to read the configuration, authenticated users must have rights to read cn, displayName, description, and whenCreated attributes for container objects in the application configuration. For most Active Directory configurations, this does not require any change.

This table summarizes the required rights.

Table 11: Authentication Services: Required rights
Rights Required For User Object Class Attributes
Create Child Object Authentication Services Administrators Only Container cn, displayName, description, showInAdvancedViewOnly
Write Attribute Authentication Services Administrators Only Container  
Read Attribute Authenticated Users Container cn, displayName, description, whenCreated

At any time you can completely remove the Authentication Services application configuration using the Remove-QasConfiguration cmdlet. However, without the application configuration Authentication Services Active Directory-based management tools do not function.

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