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One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions 6.2.0 - Administration Guide

Preface Introduction The concepts of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) The Welcome Wizard and the first login Basic settings
Supported web browsers and operating systems The structure of the web interface Network settings Configuring date and time System logging, SNMP and e-mail alerts Configuring system monitoring on SPS Data and configuration backups Archiving and cleanup Forwarding data to third-party systems Joining to One Identity Starling
User management and access control Managing One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
Controlling One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS): reboot, shutdown Managing Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) clusters Managing a High Availability One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) cluster Upgrading One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Managing the One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) license Accessing the One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) console Sealed mode Out-of-band management of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Managing the certificates used on One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
General connection settings HTTP-specific settings ICA-specific settings RDP-specific settings SSH-specific settings Telnet-specific settings VMware Horizon View connections VNC-specific settings Indexing audit trails Using the Search interface Advanced authentication and authorization techniques Reports The One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) RPC API The One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) REST API One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) scenarios Troubleshooting One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Using SPS with SPP Configuring external devices Using SCP with agent-forwarding Security checklist for configuring One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Jumplists for in-product help LDAP user and group resolution in SPS

Kerberos authentication settings

The following describes how to perform authentication with Kerberos. One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) supports both end-to-end Kerberos authentication, when the client authenticates on SPS gateway and on the target server using Kerberos, and also the half-sided Kerberos scenario when Kerberos is used only on the SPS gateway.

Prerequisites

Before configuring Kerberos authentication on One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS), make sure you have configured your Kerberos environment correctly and have retrieved the keytab file. For details, see Configuring your Kerberos environment.

To perform authentication with Kerberos

  1. Navigate to SSH Control > Authentication Policies.

  2. Create a new Authentication Policy.

  3. Select the authentication methods to use on the SPS gateway and on the target server.

    • To use Kerberos authentication on the target server, you must use Kerberos authentication both on the SPS gateway and on the target server. Select Gateway authentication method > Kerberos and Relayed authentication methods > Kerberos.

    • To use Kerberos authentication only on the SPS gateway (that is, in the client-side connection), select Gateway authentication method > Kerberos. If required, you can select other gateway authentication methods in addition to Kerberos, and also authentication backends and related to the selected gateway authentication methods.

      Select the authentication methods you want to use on the target server in the Relayed authentication methods field.

  4. Click Commit.

  5. Navigate to SSH Control > Global Options > GSSAPI.

  6. Browse for the Kerberos keytab file, and click Upload. The uploaded principals are displayed in Currently uploaded principals.

    If a Connection Policy uses an SSH Authentication Policy with Kerberos authentication together with a Usermapping Policy, then SPS stores the user principal as the gateway user, and the target username as the server username in the session database. If you want to allow your users to use a username on the target server that is different from their principal, configure a Usermapping Policy for your SSH connections. For details, see "Configuring usermapping policies" in the Administration Guide.

    Click Commit.

  7. (Optional) If more than one realm is deployed on your network, you have to specify the mapping from the server's DNS domain name to the name of its realm. To map hostnames onto Kerberos realms, click .

  8. Navigate to SSH Control > Connections and configure the SSH connection as follows. For details on configuring connections in general, see Configuring connections.

    1. Select Use fixed address or Inband destination selection as Target.

    2. Select the Kerberos Authentication policy.

    3. Click Commit.

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