Chat now with support
Chat with Support

One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions 6.4.0 - Administration Guide

Preface Introduction The concepts of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) The Welcome Wizard and the first login Basic settings
Supported web browsers and operating systems The structure of the web interface Network settings Configuring date and time System logging, SNMP and e-mail alerts Configuring system monitoring on SPS Data and configuration backups Archiving and cleanup Forwarding data to third-party systems Joining to One Identity Starling
User management and access control Managing One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
Controlling One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS): reboot, shutdown Managing Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) clusters Managing a High Availability One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) cluster Upgrading One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Managing the One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) license Accessing the One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) console Sealed mode Out-of-band management of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Managing the certificates used on One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
General connection settings HTTP-specific settings ICA-specific settings MSSQL-specific settings RDP-specific settings SSH-specific settings Telnet-specific settings VMware Horizon View connections VNC-specific settings Indexing audit trails Using the Search interface Advanced authentication and authorization techniques Reports The One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) RPC API The One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) REST API One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) scenarios Troubleshooting One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Using SPS with SPP Configuring external devices Using SCP with agent-forwarding Security checklist for configuring One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Jumplists for in-product help Configuring SPS to use an LDAP backend Glossary

MSSQL-specific settings

The following sections describe configuration settings available only for the MSSQL protocol. Use the following policies to control who, when, and how can access the MSSQL connection. For a list of supported client applications, see Supported protocols and client applications.

  • Channel Policy: The MSSQL protocol has only one channel type with no special configuration options. The available channel policy options are the following: Type, From, Target, Time policy, Four-eyes, Record audit trail, Gateway groups, Remote groups, and Content policy. For details on configuring these options, see Creating and editing channel policies.

  • TLS support: To enable TLS-encryption for your MSSQL connections, see Enabling TLS-encryption for MSSQL connections.

  • Authentication Policy: Authentication policies describe the authentication methods allowed in a connection. Different methods can be used for the client and server-side connections. For details, see Creating a new MSSQL authentication policy.

  • MSSQL settings: MSSQL settings determine the parameters of the connection on the protocol level, including timeout value, and so on. For details, see Creating and editing protocol-level MSSQL settings.

  • User lists in Channel Policies: User lists affect MSSQL connections only when they are used together with Gateway Authentication. For details, see Configuring gateway authentication.

  • Content Policy: Content policies allow you to inspect the content of the connections for various text patterns, and perform an action if the pattern is found. For example, One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) can send an e-mail alert if a specific command is used in a MSSQL terminal session. For details, see Creating a new content policy.

  • Authentication and Authorization plugin:

    One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) provides a plugin framework to integrate SPS to external systems to authenticate or authorize the user before authenticating on the target server. Such plugins can also be used to request additional information from the users, for example, to perform multi-factor authentication.

    For details, see Integrating external authentication and authorization systems.

    NOTE:Some clients (for example, Microsoft SQL Server Management Studio) establish more than one parallel connections at the same time. One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) arranges these into separate connections, and their contents are also arranged into separate audit trails.

    AA and Credstore plugins (for example, Starling 2FA plugin) will be called multiple times and can cause unexpected results. In case of plugins that require One-Time Passwords (OTP), the already accepted OTP might suddenly become invalid.

    Also, if you want to use four-eyes authorization configured for your connections, you will have to perform them for each connection.

Topics:
Related Documents