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One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions 6.8.1 - Administration Guide

Preface Introduction The concepts of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
The philosophy of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Policies Credential Stores Plugin framework Indexing Supported protocols and client applications Modes of operation Connecting to a server through One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Archive and backup concepts Maximizing the scope of auditing IPv6 in One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) SSH host keys Authenticating clients using public-key authentication in SSH The gateway authentication process Four-eyes authorization Network interfaces High Availability support in One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Versions and releases of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Accessing and configuring One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
The Welcome Wizard and the first login Basic settings
Supported web browsers and operating systems The structure of the web interface Network settings Configuring date and time System logging, SNMP and e-mail alerts Configuring system monitoring on SPS Data and configuration backups Archiving and cleanup Using plugins Forwarding data to third-party systems Joining to One Identity Starling
User management and access control Managing One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
Controlling One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS): reboot, shutdown Managing Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) clusters Managing a High Availability One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) cluster Upgrading One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Managing the One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) license Accessing the One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) console Sealed mode Out-of-band management of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Managing the certificates used on One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
General connection settings HTTP-specific settings ICA-specific settings MSSQL-specific settings RDP-specific settings SSH-specific settings Telnet-specific settings VMware Horizon View connections VNC-specific settings Indexing audit trails Using the Search interface Advanced authentication and authorization techniques Reports The One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) RPC API The One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) REST API One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) scenarios Troubleshooting One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Using SPS with SPP Configuring external devices Using SCP with agent-forwarding Security checklist for configuring One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Jumplists for in-product help Configuring SPS to use an LDAP backend Glossary

The gateway authentication process

When gateway authentication is required for a connection, the user must authenticate on One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) as well.

This additional authentication can be performed:

  • Out-of-band: in a protocol-independent way, on the web interface of SPS.

    That way the connections can be authenticated to the central authentication database (for example, LDAP or RADIUS), even if the protocol itself does not support authentication databases. Also, connections using general usernames (for example, root, Administrator, and so on) can be connected to real user accounts.

  • Inband: when the protocol allows it, using the incoming connection itself for communication with the authentication database.

    It is the SSH, RDP, and Telnet protocols that allow gateway authentication to be performed also inband, without having to access the SPS web interface.

    For SSH and Telnet connections, inband gateway authentication must be performed when client-side authentication is configured. For details on configuring client-side authentication, see Client-side authentication settings.

    For RDP connections, inband gateway authentication must be performed when SPS is acting as a Remote Desktop Gateway (or RD Gateway). In this case, the client authenticates to the Domain Controller or a local user database. For details, see Using One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) as a Remote Desktop Gateway.

    In the case of RDP connections, inband gateway authentication can also be performed if an AA plugin is configured.

Figure 15: Gateway authentication

Technically, the process of gateway authentication is the following:

  1. The user initiates a connection from a client.

  2. If gateway authentication is required for the connection, SPS pauses the connection.

  3. Out-of-band authentication:

    The user logs in to the SPS web interface, selects the connection from the list of paused connections, and enables it. It is possible to require that the authenticated session and the web session originate from the same client IP address.

    Inband authentication:

    SPS requests the username and optionally the credentials for gateway authentication. The user logs in to the SPS gateway.

  4. The user performs the authentication on the server.

    NOTE: Gateway authentication can be used together with other advanced authentication and authorization techniques like four-eyes authorization, client- and server-side authentication, and so on.

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