Chat now with support
Chat with Support

One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions 6.8.1 - Administration Guide

Preface Introduction The concepts of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
The philosophy of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Policies Credential Stores Plugin framework Indexing Supported protocols and client applications Modes of operation Connecting to a server through One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Archive and backup concepts Maximizing the scope of auditing IPv6 in One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) SSH host keys Authenticating clients using public-key authentication in SSH The gateway authentication process Four-eyes authorization Network interfaces High Availability support in One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Versions and releases of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Accessing and configuring One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
The Welcome Wizard and the first login Basic settings
Supported web browsers and operating systems The structure of the web interface Network settings Configuring date and time System logging, SNMP and e-mail alerts Configuring system monitoring on SPS Data and configuration backups Archiving and cleanup Using plugins Forwarding data to third-party systems Joining to One Identity Starling
User management and access control Managing One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
Controlling One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS): reboot, shutdown Managing Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) clusters Managing a High Availability One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) cluster Upgrading One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Managing the One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) license Accessing the One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) console Sealed mode Out-of-band management of One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Managing the certificates used on One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS)
General connection settings HTTP-specific settings ICA-specific settings MSSQL-specific settings RDP-specific settings SSH-specific settings Telnet-specific settings VMware Horizon View connections VNC-specific settings Indexing audit trails Using the Search interface Advanced authentication and authorization techniques Reports The One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) RPC API The One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) REST API One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) scenarios Troubleshooting One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Using SPS with SPP Configuring external devices Using SCP with agent-forwarding Security checklist for configuring One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) Jumplists for in-product help Configuring SPS to use an LDAP backend Glossary

Searching in the contents of audit trails

NOTE:

This feature is available only if auditing and content indexing was requested for the connection.

For more information, see Configuring the internal indexer.

You can search in the contents of the audit trails as follows:

  • From your browser: Use this method to find all the sessions containing your search query.

    Enter the screen.content: expression search query in the Search query field. For example: screen.content="exit". The search returns all the sessions where exit was on the screen.

  • From the Safeguard Desktop Player application: Use this method to find the exact location of the search query within a specific audit trail.

    Download the relevant audit trail, open it in the Safeguard Desktop Player application, and use the Search feature. You can also search in the contents of the audit trails for trails of graphical sessions created and indexed with One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) 6.0.

There are various ways you can refine your content query, you can:

  • use wildcards

  • use boolean expressions

  • search in the commands of terminal connections (for example, command:"sudo su")

  • search in the window titles of graphical connections (for example, title:settings)

Search query examples

The following sections provide examples for different search queries.

For details on how to use more complex keyphrases that are not covered in this guide, see the Apache Lucene documentation.

Searching for exact matches

By default, One Identity Safeguard for Privileged Sessions (SPS) searches for keywords as whole words and returns only exact matches. Note that if your search keywords include special characters, you must escape them with a backslash (\) character. For details on special characters, see Searching for special characters. The following characters are special characters: + - & | ! ( ) { } [ ] ^ " ~ * ? : \ /

Example: Searching for exact matches
Search expression example
Matches example
Does not match

examples

example.com

query-by-example

exam

To search for an exact phrase, enclose the search keywords in double quotes.

Search expression "example command"
Matches example command
Does not match

example

command

example: command

To search for a string that includes a backslash characters, for example, a Windows path, use two backslashes (\\).

Search expression C\:\\Windows
Matches

C:\Windows

Combining search keywords

You can use boolean operators – AND, OR, NOT, and + (required), – to combine search keywords. More complex search expressions can also be constructed with parentheses. If you enter multiple keywords,

Example: Combining keywords in search
Search expression keyword1 AND keyword2
Matches (returns hits that contain both keywords)
Search expression keyword1 OR keyword2
Matches (returns hits that contain at least one of the keywords)
Search expression "keyword1 keyword2" NOT "keyword2 keyword3"
Matches (returns hits that contain the first phrase, but not the second)
Search expression +keyword1 keyword2
Matches (returns hits that contain keyword1, and may contain keyword2)

To search for expressions that can be interpreted as boolean operators (for example: AND), use the following format: "AND".

Example: Using parentheses in search

Use parentheses to create more complex search expressions:

Search expression (keyword1 OR keyword2) AND keyword3
Matches (returns hits that contain either keyword1 and keyword3, or keyword2 and keyword3)
Using wildcard searches

You can use the ? and * wildcards in your search expressions.

Example: Using wildcard ? in search

The ? (question mark) wildcard means exactly one arbitrary character. Note that it does not work for finding non-UTF-8 or multibyte characters. If you want to search for these characters, the expression ?? might work, or you can use the * wildcard instead.

You cannot use a * or ? symbol as the first character of a search.

Search expression example?
Matches

example1

examples

example?

Does not match

example.com

example12

query-by-example

Search expression example??
Matches

example12

Does not match

example.com

example1

query-by-example

Example: Using wildcard * in search

The * wildcard means 0 or more arbitrary characters. It finds non-UTF-8 and multibyte characters as well.

Search expression example*
Matches

example

examples

example.com

Does not match

query-by-example

example*

Example: Using combined wildcards in search

Wildcard characters can be combined.

Search expression ex?mple*
Matches

example1

examples

example.com

exemple.com

example12

Does not match

exmples

query-by-example

Searching for special characters

To search for the special characters, for example, question mark (?), asterisk (*), backslash (\) or whitespace ( ) characters, you must prefix these characters with a backslash (\). Any character after a backslash is handled as character to be searched for. The following characters are special characters: + - & | ! ( ) { } [ ] ^ " ~ * ? : \ /

Example: Searching for special characters

To search for a special character, use a backslash (\).

Search expression example\?
Matches

example?

Does not match

examples

example1

To search for a string that includes a backslash characters, for example, a Windows path, use two backslashes (\\).

Search expression C\:\\Windows
Matches

C:\Windows

To search for a string that includes a slash character, for example, a UNIX path, you must escape the every slash with a backslash (\/).

Search expression \/var\/log\/messages
Matches

/var/log/messages

Search expression \(1\+1\)\:2
Matches

(1+1):2

Searching in commands and window titles

For terminal connections, use the command: prefix to search only in the commands (excluding screen content). For graphical connections, use the title: prefix to search only in the window titles (excluding screen content). To exclude search results that are commands or window titles, use the following format: keyword AND NOT title:[* TO *].

You can also combine these search queries with other expressions and wildcards, for example, title:properties AND gateway.

Example: Searching in commands and window titles
Search expression command:"sudo su"
Matches

sudo su as a terminal command

Does not match sudo su in general screen content
Search expression title:settings
Matches

settings appearing in the title of an active window

Does not match settings in general screen content

To find an expression in the screen content and exclude search results from the commands or window titles, see the following example.

Search expression properties AND NOT title:[* TO *]
Matches

properties appearing in the screen content, but not as a window title.

Does not match properties in window titles.

You can also combine these search filters with other expressions and wildcards.

Search expression title:properties AND gateway
Matches

A screen where properties appears in the window title, and gateway in the screen content (or as part of the window title).

Does not match

Screens where both properties and gateway appear, but properties is not in the window title.

Searching for fuzzy matches

Fuzzy search uses the tilde ~ symbol at the end of a single keyword to find hits that contain words with similar spelling to the keyword.

Example: Searching for fuzzy matches
Search expression roam~
Matches

roams

foam

Proximity search

Proximity search uses the tilde ~ symbol at the end of a phrase to find keywords from the phrase that are within the specified distance from each other.

Example: Proximity search
Search expression "keyword1 keyword2"~10
Matches (returns hits that contain keyword1 and keyword2 within 10 words from each other)
Adjusting the relevance of search terms

By default, every keyword or phrase of a search expression is treated as equal. Use the caret ^ symbol to make a keyword or expression more important than the others.

Example: Adjusting the relevance of search terms
Search expression keyword1^4 keyword2
Matches (returns hits that contain keyword1 and keyword2, but keyword1 is 4-times more relevant)
Search expression "keyword1 keyword2"^5 "keyword3 keyword4"
Matches (returns hits that contain keyword1 keyword2 and keyword3 keyword4, but keyword1 keyword2 is 5-times more relevant)
Related Documents

The document was helpful.

Select Rating

I easily found the information I needed.

Select Rating