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syslog-ng Premium Edition 6.0.17 - Administration Guide

Preface Chapter 1. Introduction to syslog-ng Chapter 2. The concepts of syslog-ng Chapter 3. Installing syslog-ng Chapter 4. The syslog-ng PE quick-start guide Chapter 5. The syslog-ng PE configuration file Chapter 6. Collecting log messages — sources and source drivers Chapter 7. Sending and storing log messages — destinations and destination drivers Chapter 8. Routing messages: log paths, reliability, and filters Chapter 9. Global options of syslog-ng PE Chapter 10. TLS-encrypted message transfer Chapter 11. FIPS-compliant syslog-ng Chapter 12.  Reliable Log Transfer Protocol™ Chapter 13. Reliability and minimizing the loss of log messages Chapter 14. Manipulating messages Chapter 15. Parsing and segmenting structured messages Chapter 16. Processing message content with a pattern database Chapter 17. Statistics and metrics of syslog-ng Chapter 18. Multithreading and scaling in syslog-ng PE Chapter 19. Troubleshooting syslog-ng Chapter 20. Best practices and examples

Collecting debugging information with strace, truss, or tusc

To properly troubleshoot certain situations, it can be useful to trace which system calls syslog-ng PE performs. How this is performed depends on the platform running syslog-ng PE. In general, note the following points:

  • When syslog-ng PE is started, a supervisor process might stay in the foreground, while the actual syslog-ng daemon goes to the background. Always trace the background process.

  • Apart from the system calls, the time between two system calls can be important as well. Make sure that your tracing tool records the time information as well. For details on how to do that, refer to the manual page of your specific tool (for example, strace on Linux, or truss on Solaris and BSD).

  • Run your tracing tool in verbose mode, and if possible, set it to print long output strings, so the messages are not truncated.

  • When using strace, also record the output of lsof to see which files are accessed.

The following are examples for tracing system calls of syslog-ng on some platforms. The output is saved into the /tmp/syslog-ng-trace.txt file, sufficed with the PID of the related syslog-ng process.The path of the syslog-ng binary assumes that you have installed syslog-ng PE from the official syslog-ng PE binaries available at the BalaBit website — native distribution-specific packages may use different paths.

  • Linux: strace -o /tmp/trace.txt -s256 -ff -ttT /opt/syslog-ng/sbin/syslog-ng -f /opt/syslog-ng/etc/syslog-ng.conf -Fdv

  • HP-UX: tusc -f -o /tmp/syslog-ng-trace.txt -T /opt/syslog-ng/sbin/syslog-ng

  • IBM AIX and Solaris: truss -f -o /tmp/syslog-ng-trace.txt -r all -w all -u libc:: /opt/syslog-ng/sbin/syslog-ng -d -d -d

TIP:

To execute these commands on an already running syslog-ng PE process, use the -p <pid_of_syslog-ng> parameter.

Stopping syslog-ng

To avoid problems, always use the init scripts to stop syslog-ng (/etc/init.d/syslog-ng stop), instead of using the kill command. This is especially true on Solaris and HP-UX systems, here use /etc/init.d/syslog stop.

Reporting bugs and finding help

If you need help, want to open a support ticket, or report a bug, we recommend using the syslog-debun tool to collect information about your environment and syslog-ng PE version. For details, see syslog-debun(1). For support, contact our Support Team.

Recover data from orphaned diskbuffer files

When you change the configuration of a syslog-ng PE host that uses disk-based buffering (also called disk queue), syslog-ng PE may start new disk buffer files for the destinations that you have changed. In such case, syslog-ng PE abandons the old disk queue files. If there were unsent log messages in the disk queue files, these messages remain in the disk queue files, and will not be sent to the destinations.

To find, examine, and flush the log messages from such orphaned disk queue files, see the Sending out messages stuck in syslog-ng disk queue files tutorial.

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