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syslog-ng Premium Edition 7.0.12 - Administration Guide

Preface Introduction to syslog-ng The concepts of syslog-ng Installing syslog-ng The syslog-ng PE quick-start guide The syslog-ng PE configuration file Collecting log messages — sources and source drivers
How sources work default-network-drivers: Receive and parse common syslog messages internal: Collecting internal messages file: Collecting messages from text files wildcard-file: Collecting messages from multiple text files network: Collecting messages using the RFC3164 protocol (network() driver) osquery: Collect and parse osquery result logs pipe: Collecting messages from named pipes program: Receiving messages from external applications python: writing server-style Python sources python-fetcher: writing fetcher-style Python sources snmptrap: Read Net-SNMP traps sun-streams: Collecting messages on Sun Solaris syslog: Collecting messages using the IETF syslog protocol (syslog() driver) system: Collecting the system-specific log messages of a platform systemd-journal: Collecting messages from the systemd-journal system log storage systemd-syslog: Collecting systemd messages using a socket tcp, tcp6, udp, udp6: Collecting messages from remote hosts using the BSD syslog protocol unix-stream, unix-dgram: Collecting messages from UNIX domain sockets windowsevent: Collecting Windows event logs
Sending and storing log messages — destinations and destination drivers
elasticsearch: Sending messages directly to Elasticsearch version 1.x elasticsearch2: Sending messages directly to Elasticsearch version 2.0 or higher file: Storing messages in plain-text files hdfs: Storing messages on the Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS) http: Posting messages over HTTP kafka: Publishing messages to Apache Kafka logstore: Storing messages in encrypted files mongodb: Storing messages in a MongoDB database network: Sending messages to a remote log server using the RFC3164 protocol (network() driver) pipe: Sending messages to named pipes program: Sending messages to external applications python: writing custom Python destinations smtp: Generating SMTP messages (e-mail) from logs splunk-hec: Sending messages to Splunk HTTP Event Collector sql: Storing messages in an SQL database syslog: Sending messages to a remote logserver using the IETF-syslog protocol syslog-ng: Forwarding messages and tags to another syslog-ng node tcp, tcp6, udp, udp6: Sending messages to a remote log server using the legacy BSD-syslog protocol (tcp(), udp() drivers) unix-stream, unix-dgram: Sending messages to UNIX domain sockets usertty: Sending messages to a user terminal — usertty() destination Client-side failover
Routing messages: log paths, flags, and filters Global options of syslog-ng PE TLS-encrypted message transfer Advanced Log Transfer Protocol Reliability and minimizing the loss of log messages Manipulating messages parser: Parse and segment structured messages Processing message content with a pattern database Correlating log messages Enriching log messages with external data Monitoring statistics and metrics of syslog-ng Multithreading and scaling in syslog-ng PE Troubleshooting syslog-ng Best practices and examples The syslog-ng manual pages About us

Uninstalling syslog-ng PE

If you need to uninstall syslog-ng PE for some reason, you have the following options:

  • If you have installed syslog-ng PE using the .run installer: Execute the uninstall.sh script located at /opt/syslog-ng/bin/uninstall.sh. The uninstall script will automatically restore the syslog daemon used before installing syslog-ng. To completely remove syslog-ng PE, including the configuration files, use the uninstall.sh --purge command.

  • If you have installed syslog-ng PE from a .deb package: Execute the dpkg -r syslog-ng-premium-edition command to remove syslog-ng, or the dpkg -P syslog-ng-premium-edition command to remove syslog-ng PE and the configuration files as well. Note that removing syslog-ng PE does not restore the syslog daemon used before syslog-ng.

  • If you have installed syslog-ng PE from an .rpm package: Execute the rpm -e syslog-ng-premium-edition command to remove syslog-ng PE. Note that removing syslog-ng PE does not restore the syslog daemon used before syslog-ng PE.

  • If you have installed syslog-ng PE from a .pkg package: Execute the pkgrm BBsyslng command to remove syslog-ng PE. Note that removing syslog-ng PE does not restore the syslog daemon used before syslog-ng.

    For automatic uninstall (answering y to all questions): Execute the yes | pkgrm BBsyslng command.

    The following files have to be deleted manually:

    • <syslog-ng path>/etc/syslog-ng.conf

    • <syslog-ng path>/var/syslog-ng.persist

    • <syslog-ng path>/var/syslog-ng-00000.qf

    • anything else under the <syslog-ng path>/var directory

Configuring Microsoft SQL Server to accept logs from syslog-ng

Purpose:

The following describes how to configure your Microsoft SQL Server to enable remote logins and accept log messages from syslog-ng.

To configure your Microsoft SQL Server to enable remote logins and accept log messages from syslog-ng

  1. Start the SQL Server Management Studio application. Select Start > Programs > Microsoft SQL Server 2005 > SQL Server Management Studio.

  2. Create a new database.

    1. Figure 20: Creating a new MSSQL database 1.

      In the Object Explorer, right-click on the Databases entry and select New Database.

    2. Figure 21: Creating a new MSSQL database 2.

      Enter the name of the new database (for example syslogng) into the Database name field and click OK.

  3. Create a new database user and associate it with the new database.

    1. Figure 22: Creating a new MSSQL user 1.

      In the Object Explorer, select Security, right-click on the Logins entry, then select New Login.

    2. Figure 23: Creating a new MSSQL user 2.

      Enter a name (for example syslog-ng) for the user into the Login name field.

    3. Select the SQL Server Authentication option and enter a password for the user.

    4. In the Default database field, select the database created in Step 2 (for example syslogng).

    5. In the Default language field, select the language of log messages that you want to store in the database, then click OK.

      Caution:

      Incorrect language settings may result in the database converting the messages to a different character-encoding format. That way the log messages may become unreadable, causing information loss.

    6. In the Object Explorer, select Security > Logins, then right-click on the new login created in the previous step, and select Properties.

    7. Figure 24: Associating database with the new user

      Select User Mapping. In the Users mapped to this login option, check the line corresponding to the new login (for example syslogng). In the Database role membership field, check the db_owner and public options.

  4. Figure 25: Associating database with the new user

    Enable remote logins for SQL users.

    In the Object Explorer right-click on your database server, and select Properties > Security, and set the Server Authentication option to SQL Server and Windows Authentication mode.

The syslog-ng PE quick-start guide

This chapter provides a very brief introduction into configuring the syslog-ng PE application. For details on the format of the configuration file and how to configure sources, destinations, and other features, refer to the subsequent chapters.

Configuring syslog-ng on client hosts

Purpose:

The following describes how to configure syslog-ng on a client host.

To configure syslog-ng on a client host

  1. Install the syslog-ng application on the host. For details installing syslog-ng on specific operating systems, see Installing syslog-ng.

  2. Configure the local sources to collect the log messages of the host. Starting with version 3.2, syslog-ng PE automatically collects the log messages that use the native system logging method of the platform, for example, messages from /dev/log on Linux, or /dev/klog on FreeBSD. For a complete list of messages that are collected automatically, see system: Collecting the system-specific log messages of a platform.

    Add sources to collect the messages from your log files. File sources look like this:

    source s_myfilesource {
            file("/var/log/myapplication.log" follow-freq(1)); };

    Name every source uniquely. For details on configuring file sources, see file: Collecting messages from text files.

    TIP:

    Many applications send log messages to logfiles by default (for example, the Roundcube webmail client, or the ProFTPD FTP server), but can be configured to send them to syslog instead. If possible, it is recommended to reconfigure the application that way.

    NOTE:

    The default configuration file of syslog-ng PE collects platform-specific log messages and the internal log messages of syslog-ng PE.

    source s_local {
            system();
            internal();
    };
  3. Create a network destination that points directly to the syslog-ng server, or to a local relay. The network destination greatly depends on the protocol that your log server or relay accepts messages. Many systems still use the legacy BSD-syslog protocol (RFC3162) over the unreliable UDP transport:

    destination d_network { network("10.1.2.3" transport("udp")); };

    However, if possible, use the much more reliable IETF-syslog protocol over TCP transport:

    destination d_network { syslog("10.1.2.3" transport("tcp")); };

    Make sure to use a destination that matches the source you configure on your syslog-ng server or relay. For details, see Things to consider when forwarding messages between syslog-ng PE hosts.

  4. Create a log statement connecting the local sources to the syslog-ng server or relay. For example:

    log {
            source(s_local); destination(d_network); };
  5. If the logs will also be stored locally on the host, create local file destinations.

    NOTE:

    The default configuration of syslog-ng PE places the collected messages into the /var/log/messages file:

    destination d_local {
        file("/var/log/messages"); };
  6. Create a log statement connecting the local sources to the file destination.

    NOTE:

    The default configuration of syslog-ng PE has only one log statement:

    log {
        source(s_local); destination(d_local); };
  7. Set filters, macros and other features and options (for example TLS encryption) as necessary.

    Example: The default configuration file of syslog-ng PE

    The following is the default configuration file of syslog-ng PE 7. It collects local log messages and the log messages of syslog-ng PE and saves them in the /var/log/messages file.

    @version: 7.0
    @include "scl.conf"
    source s_local { system(); internal(); };
    destination d_local {
                file("/var/log/messages"); };
    log { source(s_local); destination(d_local); };
    Example: A simple configuration for clients

    The following is a simple configuration file that collects local log messages and forwards them to a logserver using the IETF-syslog protocol.

    @version: 7.0
    @include "scl.conf"
    source s_local { system(); internal(); };
    destination d_syslog_tcp {
                 syslog("192.168.1.1" transport("tcp") port(2010)); };
    log { source(s_local);destination(d_syslog_tcp); };

    If you experience difficulties, see Troubleshooting syslog-ng for tips on solving common problems.

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