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Active Roles 7.2.1 - Administrator Guide

Introduction About Active Roles Getting Started Rule-based Administrative Views Role-based Administration
Access Templates as administrative roles Access Template management tasks Examples of use Deployment considerations Windows claims-based Access Rules
Rule-based AutoProvisioning and Deprovisioning
About Policy Objects Policy Object management tasks Policy configuration tasks
Property Generation and Validation User Logon Name Generation Group Membership AutoProvisioning E-mail Alias Generation Exchange Mailbox AutoProvisioning Home Folder AutoProvisioning Script Execution User Account Deprovisioning Group Membership Removal Exchange Mailbox Deprovisioning Home Folder Deprovisioning User Account Relocation User Account Permanent Deletion Group Object Deprovisioning Group Object Relocation Group Object Permanent Deletion Notification Distribution Report Distribution
Deployment considerations Checking for policy compliance Deprovisioning users or groups Restoring deprovisioned users or groups Container Deletion Prevention policy Picture management rules Policy extensions
Workflows
Understanding workflow Workflow activities overview Configuring a workflow
Creating a workflow definition Configuring workflow start conditions Configuring workflow parameters Adding activities to a workflow Configuring an Approval activity Configuring a Notification activity Configuring a Script activity Configuring an If-Else activity Configuring a Stop/Break activity Configuring an Add Report Section activity Configuring a Search activity Configuring CRUD activities Configuring a Save Object Properties activity Configuring a Modify Requested Changes activity Enabling or disabling an activity Enabling or disabling a workflow Using the initialization script
Example: Approval workflow E-mail based approval Automation workflow Activity extensions
Temporal Group Memberships Group Family Dynamic Groups Active Roles Reporting Management History
Understanding Management History Management History configuration Viewing change history
Workflow activity report sections Policy report items Active Roles internal policy report items
Examining user activity
Entitlement Profile Recycle Bin AD LDS Data Management Managing Configuration of Active Roles
Connecting to the Administration Service Adding and removing managed domains Using unmanaged domains Evaluating product usage Configuring replication Using AlwaysOn Availability Groups Using database mirroring Creating and using virtual attributes Examining client sessions Monitoring performance Customizing the console Using Configuration Center Changing the Active Roles Admin account Enabling or disabling diagnostic logs Active Roles Log Viewer
Using regular expressions Administrative Template Communication ports

Enabling or disabling diagnostic logs

Managing Configuration of Active Roles > Enabling or disabling diagnostic logs

Active Roles administrators can enable diagnostic logging at the request of support personnel to assist them in finding root causes of issues that occur during Active Roles operations. The diagnostic information includes the Active Roles configuration statistics (referred to as Active Roles system summary), the Active Roles Administration Service diagnostic log and the Active Roles Console diagnostic log.

The Active Roles Administration Service’s diagnostic log (ds.log) contains tracing information, such as API calls, internal function calls and state transitions performed by the Administration Service. This information is stored in the ds.log file that you can send to the support team for issue diagnostic purposes. Two logging levels are available: Basic and Verbose. The Verbose option writes much more information to the log, which can aid in the process of isolating an issue. However, with the increase in verbosity comes a corresponding decrease in performance and increase in the size of the log file.

The Active Roles console’s diagnostic log (EDMSnap.txt) contains debugging information specific to the Active Roles console, and can be helpful in isolating console-related issues.

You can use the Active Roles console to perform the following tasks:

  • Export Active Roles system summary.

    This option allows you to save the Active Roles configuration statistics to a file that you can later send to the support team for issue diagnostic purposes.

  • Turn the Administration Service’s diagnostic log on or off.

    The console shows the path to the log file located on the computer running the Administration Service.

  • Choose the level of verbosity for the Administration Service: Basic or Verbose.

    The Verbose option results in a more detailed log, but considerably increases the size of the log file.

  • Turn the console’s diagnostic log on or off.

    The console shows the path to the console’s log file on the local computer.

It is also possible to enable or disable diagnostic logs by using Configuration Center (see Logging management tasks earlier in this document). The following instructions apply to the Active Roles console.

To view or change the diagnostic settings

  1. Log on as an Active Roles Admin, and open the Active Roles console.
  2. In the Active Roles console tree, click the root node to display the Active Roles summary page in the details pane.
  3. On the summary page, expand the Diagnostics area.

    In the Diagnostics area, you can view whether the Active Roles Administration Service’s diagnostic logging is currently enabled (turned on) or disabled (turned off).

  1. In the Diagnostics area, click View or change diagnostic settings.

    This opens the Diagnostics page in the Properties dialog box for the Administration Service instance to which the console is currently connected. Another way to open that page is by directly opening the Properties dialog box from the Administration Service object in the Configuration/Server Configuration/Administration Services container.

  1. Use the Diagnostics page to perform the following tasks:
  2. Click Export Active Roles system summary to save the Active Roles configuration statistics to a file that you can later send to the support team for issue diagnostic purposes.
    • Click the appropriate option to turn on or off the Administration Service’s log. This option enables or disables the Administration Service diagnostic logging on the computer running the Administration Service instance to which the console is currently connected.
    • Choose the level of verbosity from the Logging level list, if you have selected the option to turn on the Administration Service’s log.
    • View the path and name of the Administration Service’s log file, along with the name of the computer that holds the log file.
    • Click the appropriate option to turn on or off the console’s log. This option enables or disables the console diagnostic logging on the local computer.
    • View the path and name of the console’s log file, along with the name of the computer that holds the log file.
  3. When finished, click OK or Apply for your changes to take effect.

Active Roles Log Viewer

Managing Configuration of Active Roles > Active Roles Log Viewer

Active Roles Log Viewer

The Log Viewer tool enables you to browse and analyze diagnostic log files created by the Active Roles Administration Service as well as event log files created by saving the Active Roles event log in Event Viewer on the computer running the Administration Service. Log Viewer can help you drill down through the sequence or hierarchy of requests processed by the Administration Service, identify error conditions that the Administration Service encountered during request processing, and find Knowledge Articles that apply to a given error condition.

With Log Viewer, you can open an Active Roles diagnostic log file (ds.log) or saved event log file (.evtx), and view a list of:

  • Errors encountered by the Administration Service and recorded in the log file
  • Requests processed by the Administration Service and traced in the log file
  • All trace records found in the diagnostic log file
  • All events found in the event log file

When you select an error in the list, you can choose a command to look for solution in Knowledge Base. The command performs a search in One Identity Software Knowledge Base to list the Knowledge Articles that can provide helpful information on how to troubleshoot the error you selected.

Log Viewer also enables you to:

  • Search the list for a particular text string, such as an error message
  • Filter the list by various conditions, to narrow the set of list items to those you are interested in
  • View detailed information about each list item, such as error details, request details or stack trace

Using Log Viewer

To start Log Viewer, click Start Log Viewer in the Configuration Center main window.

Once you have started Log Viewer, open your Active Roles diagnostic log file or saved event log file: Click Open on the Log Viewer toolbar, and supply the path and name of the log file.

By default, Log Viewer displays a list of errors encountered by the Administration Service and recorded in the log file. You can use Log Viewer to look for information on how to troubleshoot a given error: Right-click the error in the list and then click Look for solution in Knowledge Base. Log Viewer performs a search in One Identity Software Knowledge Base to list the Knowledge Articles that apply to the error you selected.

Other tasks you can perform:

  • To view a list of requests processed by the Administration Service and traced in the log file, click Requests in the View area on the Log Viewer toolbar.
  • To view all trace records found in the diagnostic log file or all events found in the event log file, click Raw log records in the View area on the Log Viewer toolbar.
  • To search the list for a particular text string, such as an error message, type the text string in the Search box on the Log Viewer toolbar and press Enter.
  • To narrow the set of list items to those you are interested in, click Filter on the Log Viewer toolbar and specify the desired filter conditions.
  • To view detailed information about an error, request, trace record or event, right-click the corresponding list item, and click Details.
  • To view all trace records that apply to a given request, right-click the corresponding item in the Requests list and click Stack trace. This task is unavailable in case of an event log file.
  • To view the request that caused a given error, right-click the error in the Errors list and click Related request. This task is unavailable in case of an event log file.

To view all trace records that apply to the request that caused a given error, right-click the error in the Errors list and click Stack trace for related request. This task is unavailable in case of an event log file.

 

Using regular expressions

Appendix A: Using regular expressions

Appendix A: Using regular expressions

When configuring search filter conditions or property validation criteria, you may need to use regular expressions. This section helps you learn about the syntax you must use in regular expressions.

A regular expression is a pattern of text that consists of ordinary characters (for example, letters a to z) and special characters, known as metacharacters. It serves as a template for matching a character pattern to the string value being validated.

The following table contains a list of metacharacters and their behavior in the context of regular expressions that can be used to create search filter conditions and property validation criteria in Active Roles. To match an exact metacharacter, precede the character with a backslash (\).

Table 95: Metacharacters in the context of regular expressions

Character

Definition

\

Marks the next character as a special character, a literal, or an octal escape. For example, n matches the character n; \n matches a new line character. The sequence \\ matches \ and \( matches (.

^

Matches the position at the beginning of the input string.

$

Matches the position at the end of the input string.

*

Matches the preceding sub-expression zero or more times. For example, zo* matches z and zoo. * is equivalent to {0,}.

+

Matches the preceding sub-expression one or more times. For example, zo+ matches zo and zoo, but not z. + is equivalent to {1,}.

?

Matches the preceding sub-expression zero or one time. For example, do(es)? matches the do in do and does. ? is equivalent to {0,1}.

{n}

n is a nonnegative integer. Matches the preceding sub-expression exactly n times. For example, o{2} does not match the o in Bob, but matches the two o’s in food.

{n,}

n is a nonnegative integer. Matches the preceding sub-expression at least n times. For example, o{2,} does not match the o in Bob, but matches all the o’s in foooood. o{1,} is equivalent to o+. o{0,} is equivalent to o*.

{n,m}

m and n are nonnegative integers, where n <= m. Matches the preceding sub-expression at least n and at most m times. For example, o{1,3} matches the first three o’s in fooooood. o{0,1} is equivalent to o?. Note that there cannot be spaces between the comma and the numbers.

?

When this character immediately follows any of the other quantifiers (*, +, ?, {n}, {n,}, {n,m}), the matching pattern is non-greedy. A non-greedy pattern matches as little of the searched string as possible, whereas the default greedy pattern matches as much of the searched string as possible. For example, in the string oooo, o+? matches a single o, while o+ matches all o’s.

.

Matches any single character except \n. To match any character including the \n, use a pattern such as [.\n].

( )

Groups one or more regular expressions to establish a logical regular expression consisting of sub-expressions. Used to override the standard precedence of certain operators. To match parentheses characters ( ), use \( or \).

x|y

Matches either x or y. For example, z|food matches z or food. (z|f)ood matches zood or food.

[xyz]

A character set. Matches any one of the enclosed characters. For example, [abc] matches the a in plain.

[^xyz]

A negative character set. Matches any character not enclosed. For example, [^abc] matches the p in plain.

[a-z]

A range of characters. Matches any character in the specified range. For example, [a-z] matches any lowercase alphabetical character in the range a to z.

[^a-z]

A negative range of characters. Matches any character not in the specified range. For example, [^a-z] matches any character not in the range a to z.

\b

Matches a word boundary, that is, the position between a word and a space. For example, er\b matches the er in never but not the er in verb.

\B

Matches a non-word boundary. For example, er\B matches the er in verb but not the er in never.

\cx

Matches the control character indicated by x. For example, \cM matches a Control-M or carriage return character. The value of x must be in the range of A-Z or a-z. If not, c is assumed to be a literal c character.

\d

Matches a digit character. Equivalent to [0-9].

\D

Matches a non-digit character. Equivalent to [^0-9].

\s

Matches any white space character including space, tab, form-feed, etc. Equivalent to [ \f\n\r\t\v].

\S

Matches any non-white space character. Equivalent to [^ \f\n\r\t\v].

\w

Matches any word character including underscore. Equivalent to [A-Za-z0-9_].

\W

Matches any non-word character. Equivalent to [^A-Za-z0-9_].

\xn

Matches n, where n is a hexadecimal escape value. Hexadecimal escape values must be exactly two digits long. For example, \x41 matches A. Allows ASCII codes to be used in regular expressions.

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