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Active Roles 7.2 - Administration Guide

Introduction About Active Roles Getting Started Rule-based Administrative Views Role-based Administration
Access Templates as administrative roles Access Template management tasks Examples of use Deployment considerations Windows claims-based Access Rules
Rule-based AutoProvisioning and Deprovisioning
About Policy Objects Policy Object management tasks Policy configuration tasks
Property Generation and Validation User Logon Name Generation Group Membership AutoProvisioning E-mail Alias Generation Exchange Mailbox AutoProvisioning Home Folder AutoProvisioning Script Execution User Account Deprovisioning Group Membership Removal Exchange Mailbox Deprovisioning Home Folder Deprovisioning User Account Relocation User Account Permanent Deletion Group Object Deprovisioning Group Object Relocation Group Object Permanent Deletion Notification Distribution Report Distribution
Deployment considerations Checking for policy compliance Deprovisioning users or groups Restoring deprovisioned users or groups Container Deletion Prevention policy Picture management rules Policy extensions
Workflows
Understanding workflow Workflow activities overview Configuring a workflow
Creating a workflow definition Configuring workflow start conditions Configuring workflow parameters Adding activities to a workflow Configuring an Approval activity Configuring a Notification activity Configuring a Script activity Configuring an If-Else activity Configuring a Stop/Break activity Configuring an Add Report Section activity Configuring a Search activity Configuring CRUD activities Configuring a Save Object Properties activity Configuring a Modify Requested Changes activity Enabling or disabling an activity Enabling or disabling a workflow Using the initialization script
Example: Approval workflow E-mail based approval Automation workflow Activity extensions
Temporal Group Memberships Group Family Dynamic Groups Active Roles Reporting Management History
Understanding Management History Management History configuration Viewing change history
Workflow activity report sections Policy report items Active Roles internal policy report items
Examining user activity
Entitlement Profile Recycle Bin AD LDS Data Management Managing Configuration of Active Roles
Connecting to the Administration Service Adding and removing managed domains Using unmanaged domains Evaluating product usage Configuring replication Using AlwaysOn Availability Groups Using database mirroring Creating and using virtual attributes Examining client sessions Monitoring performance Customizing the console Using Configuration Center Changing the Active Roles Admin account Enabling or disabling diagnostic logs Active Roles Log Viewer
Using regular expressions Administrative Template Communication ports

Entitlement type

The entitlement type setting is basically intended to determine the entitlement target object—the object to which Active Roles applies the entitlement rules when building the entitlement profile. Entitlement types can be classified by how a user’s entitlement to a resource is configured:

  • Personal resource entitlement  Configured by setting certain attribute of the user’s account itself. In this case, the user’s account plays the role of the entitlement target object.
  • Shared resource entitlement  Configured by adding the user to a certain security group. In this case, the group plays the role of the entitlement target object.
  • Managed resource entitlement  Configured by assigning the user to the manager or owner role for a certain object. In this case, the object managed or owned by the user plays the role of the entitlement target object.

The following table summarizes the types of entitlement.

Table 91: Types of entitlement

Type

Configuration

Target Object

Personal resource entitlement

The user’s account has certain resource-specific attributes set in the directory.

The user’s account

Shared resource entitlement

The user’s account belongs to a certain security group in Active Directory.

The user’s group

Managed resource entitlement

The user’s account is specified as the primary owner (manager) or a secondary owner of a certain object in the directory.

The object managed or owned by the user

Entitlement rules

When building a user’s entitlement profile, Active Roles uses a specifier’s entitlement rules to tell whether the user is entitled to the resource represented by that specifier. The rules are evaluated against the entitlement target object. If the object matches the rules, then Active Roles regards the user as entitled to the resource, and adds information about the resource to the user’s entitlement profile.

Entitlement rules can be classified by rule condition as follows:

  • Explicit exclusion  The rule condition is a list of directory objects. If the entitlement target object occurs in that list, it is regarded as not matching the rules.
  • Explicit inclusion  The rule condition is a list of directory objects. If the entitlement target object occurs in that list, it is regarded as matching the rules.
  • Filter-based exclusion  The rule condition is one or more filters each of which represents certain requirements on an object’s location and properties. If the entitlement target object satisfies the requirements of at least one filter, then it is regarded as not matching the rules.
  • Filter-based inclusion  The rule condition is one or more filters each of which represents certain requirements on an object’s location and properties. If the entitlement target object satisfies the requirements of at least one filter, then it is regarded as matching the rules.

For details on how Active Roles applies entitlement rules, see About entitlement profile build process later in this document.

Resource display

For each resource that is to be included in the entitlement profile, Active Roles applies entitlement rules to single out the appropriate specifier and then it uses the resource display settings of that specifier to build the entitlement profile’s section that displays information about the resource.

The resource display settings include the following:

  • Resource type icon  Graphics that helps distinguish the type of the resource in the entitlement profile.
  • Resource type name  Text string that identifies the type of the resource in the entitlement profile.
  • Resource naming attribute  Entitlement target object’s attribute whose value is used to identify the resource in the entitlement profile.
  • Other resource-related attributes  List of the entitlement target object’s attributes whose values are to be displayed in the entitlement profile.

The entitlement profile’s section for a given resource is divided into two areas:

  • Heading  Displays the resource type icon, resource type name, and value of the resource naming attribute.
  • Details  Lists the names and values of the resource-related attributes.

The Details area can be customized by adding HTML code to a certain attribute of the user account for which the entitlement profile is being built. The LDAP display name of that attribute should be supplied in the edsaHTMLDetailsAttribute of the entitlement profile specifier. As a result, Active Roles renders that HTML code instead of displaying the attributes list in the Details area.

About entitlement profile build process

When requested to build a user’s entitlement profile, Active Roles performs the following steps.

  1. Prepare a list of the user’s groups, that is, a list of the security groups to which the user belongs whether directly or because of group nesting.
  2. Prepare a list of the user’s managed objects, that is, a list of the directory objects for which the user is assigned as the primary owner (manager) or a secondary owner.
  3. For each entitlement profile specifier of the personal resource entitlement type, evaluate the entitlement rules of that specifier against the user’s account. If the user’s account matches the entitlement rules, then add information about the resource to the entitlement profile, presenting the resource in accordance with the resource display settings found in the specifier.
  4. For each of the user’s groups, apply the entitlement profile specifiers of the shared resource entitlement type as follows:
    1. For each specifier, evaluate the entitlement rules of that specifier against the group.
    2. Once a specifier has been found such that the group matches its entitlement rules, then add information about the resource to the entitlement profile, presenting the resource in accordance with the resource display settings held in the specifier.
    3. If the group matches the entitlement rules of more than one specifier, apply the first specifier found and disregard the others.
  5. For each of the user’s managed objects, apply the entitlement profile specifiers of the managed resource entitlement type as follows:
    1. For each specifier, evaluate the entitlement rules of that specifier against the managed object.
    2. Once a specifier has been found such that the managed object matches its entitlement rules, then add information about the resource to the entitlement profile, presenting the resource in accordance with the resource display settings held in the specifier.
    3. If the managed object matches the entitlement rules of more than one specifier, apply the first specifier found and disregard the others.

Entitlement rules play a central part in the process of building the entitlement profile. It is the entitlement rules that determine whether Active Roles regards a given user as entitled to a given resource, and thus adds information about that resource to the user’s entitlement profile. When evaluating entitlement rules against a particular object, Active Roles performs the following steps.

  1. Apply the explicit exclusion rules. If the object is in the list of excluded objects, then disregard the remaining rules, and mark the object as not matching the rules. Otherwise, proceed to the next step.
  2. Apply the explicit inclusion rules. If the object is in the list of included objects, then disregard the remaining rules, and mark the object as matching the rules. Otherwise, proceed to the next step.
  3. Apply the filter-based exclusion rules. If the object satisfies the rule condition, then disregard the remaining rules, and mark the object as not matching the rules. Otherwise, proceed to the next step.
  4. Apply the filter-based inclusion rules. If the object satisfies the rule condition, then mark the object as matching the rules.

It may occur that the entitlement target object matches the entitlement rules of more than one specifier. In this case, Active Roles needs to choose a single specifier from those matching the entitlement target object. This is accomplished as follows:

  1. Examine the edsaPriority attribute of each specifier, and look for specifiers that have edsaPriority not set. If no such specifier found, then proceed to Step 3. If a single specifier found, then apply that specifier. Otherwise, proceed to Step 2.
  2. Range the specifiers that have edsaPriority not set in ascending alphanumeric order by name, and apply the specifier that goes first. Do not perform Steps 3–4.
  3. Choose the specifiers with the lowest edsaPriority value. If a single specifier has the lowest edsaPriority value, then apply that specifier. Otherwise, proceed to the next step.
  4. Range the specifiers with the lowest edsaPriority value in ascending alphanumeric order by name, and apply the specifier that goes first.

Note that the specifiers that have edsaPriority not set take precedence over those for which edsaPriority is set.

Once Active Roles has identified a single specifier for entitlement to a given resource, it uses the resource display settings of the specifier to build a section of the entitlement profile that displays information about the resource. If multiple resources match a particular specifier, then the sections specific to those resources are grouped together in an expandable block, to prevent the entitlement profile display from cluttering.

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