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Active Roles 7.2 - Administration Guide

Introduction About Active Roles Getting Started Rule-based Administrative Views Role-based Administration
Access Templates as administrative roles Access Template management tasks Examples of use Deployment considerations Windows claims-based Access Rules
Rule-based AutoProvisioning and Deprovisioning
About Policy Objects Policy Object management tasks Policy configuration tasks
Property Generation and Validation User Logon Name Generation Group Membership AutoProvisioning E-mail Alias Generation Exchange Mailbox AutoProvisioning Home Folder AutoProvisioning Script Execution User Account Deprovisioning Group Membership Removal Exchange Mailbox Deprovisioning Home Folder Deprovisioning User Account Relocation User Account Permanent Deletion Group Object Deprovisioning Group Object Relocation Group Object Permanent Deletion Notification Distribution Report Distribution
Deployment considerations Checking for policy compliance Deprovisioning users or groups Restoring deprovisioned users or groups Container Deletion Prevention policy Picture management rules Policy extensions
Workflows
Understanding workflow Workflow activities overview Configuring a workflow
Creating a workflow definition Configuring workflow start conditions Configuring workflow parameters Adding activities to a workflow Configuring an Approval activity Configuring a Notification activity Configuring a Script activity Configuring an If-Else activity Configuring a Stop/Break activity Configuring an Add Report Section activity Configuring a Search activity Configuring CRUD activities Configuring a Save Object Properties activity Configuring a Modify Requested Changes activity Enabling or disabling an activity Enabling or disabling a workflow Using the initialization script
Example: Approval workflow E-mail based approval Automation workflow Activity extensions
Temporal Group Memberships Group Family Dynamic Groups Active Roles Reporting Management History
Understanding Management History Management History configuration Viewing change history
Workflow activity report sections Policy report items Active Roles internal policy report items
Examining user activity
Entitlement Profile Recycle Bin AD LDS Data Management Managing Configuration of Active Roles
Connecting to the Administration Service Adding and removing managed domains Using unmanaged domains Evaluating product usage Configuring replication Using AlwaysOn Availability Groups Using database mirroring Creating and using virtual attributes Examining client sessions Monitoring performance Customizing the console Using Configuration Center Changing the Active Roles Admin account Enabling or disabling diagnostic logs Active Roles Log Viewer
Using regular expressions Administrative Template Communication ports

Delegation of Organizational Unit administration

Role-based Administration > Deployment considerations > Delegation of Organizational Unit administration

The following table lists a sample set of permission entries for a scenario of delegating administration of Organizational Units:

Table 9: Permission entries for delegating administration of Organizational Units

Object Class

Permission Type

Attribute or Permission

Domain

Object Access

Allow List

Domain

Object Property Access

Allow Read All Properties

Domain

Object Property Access

Allow Write LDAP Server (permission to change Operational Domain Controller)

Organizational Unit

Object Access

Allow List

Organizational Unit

Object Property Access

Allow Read All Properties

Organizational Unit

Child Object Creation/Deletion

Allow Create/Delete Users

User

Object Access

Allow List

User

Object Property Access

Allow Read/Write All Properties

User

Object Property Access

Deny Write Employee ID

This set of permission entries has several important characteristics:

  • It allows access to the Domain and the Organizational Unit object classes. This is because without access to the domain and the Organizational Units a delegated administrator cannot see the users beneath. This access should always include the List and Read All Properties permissions.
  • It gives a delegated administrator the ability to create and delete user objects. This permission applies to the Organizational Unit object class.
  • It gives a delegated administrator the ability to see (List) users and modify any property except Employee ID.

Delegation of group administration

Role-based Administration > Deployment considerations > Delegation of group administration

The following table lists a sample set of permission entries for a scenario of delegating administration of groups:

Table 10: Permission entries for delegating administration of groups

Object Class

Permission Type

Attribute or Permission

Domain

Object Access

Allow List

Domain

Object Property Access

Allow Read All Properties

Domain

Object Property Access

Allow Write LDAP Server (permission to change Operational Domain Controller)

Organizational Unit

Object Access

Allow List

Organizational Unit

Object Property Access

Allow Read All Properties

Organizational Unit

Child Object Creation/Deletion

Allow Create/Delete Groups

Group

Object Access

Allow List

Group

Object Property Access

Allow Read All Properties

Group

Object Property Access

Allow Write Members

User

Object Access

Allow List

User

Object Property Access

Allow Read All Properties

This set of permission entries has several important characteristics:

  • It allows access to the Domain and the Organizational Unit object classes. This is because without access to the domain and the Organizational Units a delegated administrator cannot see the groups and users beneath. This access should always include the List and Read All Properties permissions.
  • It gives a delegated administrator the ability to create and delete group objects. This permission applies to the Organizational Unit object class.
  • It gives a delegated administrator the ability to see (List) groups, view any property of a group (Read All Properties), and add or remove members from a group (Write Members).
  • It gives a delegated administrator the ability to see (List) users and view any property of a user (Read All Properties). This is necessary for a delegated administrator to be able to add users to a group.

Delegation in a functional vs. hosted environment

Role-based Administration > Deployment considerations > Delegation in a functional vs. hosted environment

For your delegation model to work correctly, you need to determine whether you have a functional or hosted environment.

Delegation in a functional environment

In a functional environment there is a separate group of administrators for each function. So there may be a group for managing users, a helpdesk, domain administrators, and Exchange administrators. In case of a functional environment, you need to decide on a certain role for each function. These roles usually cross Organizational Unit boundaries so delegation is typically done at the root of the domain or domains. Typically a delegation model for this scenario would look something like the following:

Table 11: Delegation model in a functional environment

Location / Template

Permission

Delegate (Trustee)

Domain / Read All Objects

  • All Objects - List
  • All Objects - Read All Properties
  • Domain - Write LDAP Server Property (permission to change Operational Domain Controller)

Authenticated Users

Domain / User Admin

  • User Objects - Full Control
  • Organizational Unit - Create/Delete User Objects

User Admin group

Domain / Group Admin

  • Group Objects - Full Control
  • Organizational Unit - Create/Delete Group Objects

Group Admin group

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