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Active Roles 7.4.1 - Administration Guide

Introduction About Active Roles Getting Started Rule-based Administrative Views Role-based Administration
Access Templates as administrative roles Access Template management tasks Examples of use Deployment considerations Windows claims-based Access Rules
Rule-based AutoProvisioning and Deprovisioning
About Policy Objects Policy Object management tasks Policy configuration tasks
Property Generation and Validation User Logon Name Generation Group Membership AutoProvisioning E-mail Alias Generation Exchange Mailbox AutoProvisioning AutoProvisioning for SaaS products OneDrive Provisioning Home Folder AutoProvisioning Script Execution Office 365 License Management Office 365 Roles Management User Account Deprovisioning Office 365 Licenses Retention Group Membership Removal Exchange Mailbox Deprovisioning Home Folder Deprovisioning User Account Relocation User Account Permanent Deletion Group Object Deprovisioning Group Object Relocation Group Object Permanent Deletion Notification Distribution Report Distribution
Deployment considerations Checking for policy compliance Deprovisioning users or groups Restoring deprovisioned users or groups Container Deletion Prevention policy Picture management rules Policy extensions
Workflows
Understanding workflow Workflow activities overview Configuring a workflow
Creating a workflow definition Configuring workflow start conditions Configuring workflow parameters Adding activities to a workflow Configuring an Approval activity Configuring a Notification activity Configuring a Script activity Configuring an If-Else activity Configuring a Stop/Break activity Configuring an Add Report Section activity Configuring a Search activity Configuring CRUD activities Configuring a Save Object Properties activity Configuring a Modify Requested Changes activity Enabling or disabling an activity Enabling or disabling a workflow Using the initialization script
Example: Approval workflow E-mail based approval Automation workflow Activity extensions
Temporal Group Memberships Group Family Dynamic Groups Active Roles Reporting Management History
Understanding Management History Management History configuration Viewing change history
Workflow activity report sections Policy report items Active Roles internal policy report items
Examining user activity
Entitlement Profile Recycle Bin AD LDS Data Management One Identity Starling Management One Identity Starling Two-factor Authentication for Active Roles Managing One Identity Starling Connect Azure_Overview
Config ARS to Manage Hybrid AD Objects Managing Hybrid AD Users Office 365 roles management for hybrid environment users Managing Office 365 Contacts Managing Hybrid AD Groups Managing Azure O365 or Unified Groups
Managing Configuration of Active Roles
Connecting to the Administration Service Adding and removing managed domains Using unmanaged domains Evaluating product usage Creating and using virtual attributes Examining client sessions Monitoring performance Customizing the console Using Configuration Center Changing the Active Roles Admin account Enabling or disabling diagnostic logs Active Roles Log Viewer
SQL Server Replication Appendix A: Using regular expressions Appendix B: Administrative Template Appendix C: Communication ports Appendix D: Active Roles and supported Azure environments Appendix E: Enabling delegation for Federated Authentication

Wildcards

You can also add wildcards and conditions to a search filter. The following examples show substrings that can be used to search the directory.

Get all entries:

(objectClass=*)

Get entries containing “bob” somewhere in the common name:

(cn=*bob*)

Get entries with a common name greater than or equal to “bob”:

(cn>='bob')

Get all users with an e-mail attribute:

(&(objectClass=user)(mail=*))

Get all user entries with an e-mail attribute and a surname equal to “smith”:

(&(sn=smith)(objectClass=user)(mail=*))

Get all user entries with a common name that starts with “andy”, “steve”, or “margaret”:

(&(objectClass=user) | (cn=andy*)(cn=steve)(cn=margaret))

Get all entries without an e-mail attribute:

(!(mail=*))

Special characters

If any of the following special characters must appear in the search filter as literals, they must be replaced by the listed escape sequence.

Table 7: Special characters in Search filter

ASCII Character

Escape Sequence Substitute

*

\2a

(

\28

)

\29

\

\5c

NUL

\00

In addition, arbitrary binary data may be represented using the escape sequence syntax by encoding each byte of binary data with the backslash (\) followed by two hexadecimal digits. For example, the four-byte value 0x00000004 is encoded as \00\00\00\04 in a filter string.

Getting policy-related information

In object creation wizards and properties dialog boxes, some property labels may be displayed as hyperlinks. This indicates that Active Roles enforces policy restrictions on the property.

In the following figure, the User logon name and User logon name (pre-Windows 2000) labels are underlined, which means that these properties are under the control of a certain policy defined with Active Roles.

Figure 3: Policy related information

To examine the policy in detail, you can click the label. For example, if you click User logon name (pre-Windows 2000), the Active Roles console presents you with a window similar to the following figure.

Figure 4: Policy description

The window may display the following information:

  • Policy Description  Provides a brief description of the policy.
  • Message  Details the problem if the supplied property value violates the policy.

You can click arrows in the lower-left corner to display description of other policies enforced on the given property.

The Message section is displayed whenever the specified property value violates the policy. The following figure illustrates the situation where a value has not been supplied for a mandatory property.

Figure 5: Policy violation message

When you click Go To in this window, the console moves the pointer to the field that needs to be corrected. You can type or select an appropriate value to correct your input.

 

Performing Batch operations

In the Web Interface, you can select multiple objects (such as users, groups and computers), and then apply a certain command to your selection of objects. This allows you to perform a batch operation on all the selected objects at a time instead of executing the command on each object separately. The Web Interface supports the following batch operations:

  • Delete  Allows you to delete multiple objects at a time.
  • Deprovision  Allows you to deprovision multiple users or groups at a time.
  • Move  Allows you to move a batch of objects to a different organizational unit or container.
  • Add to groups  Allows you to add a batch of objects to one or more groups of your choice.
  • Update object attributes Allows you to perform bulk attributes operations for multiple users at a time.
  • Reset Password Allows you to reset the password for multiple users at a time.

Batch operations are available in the list of objects on the following Web Interface pages:

  • Search  This page lists the search results when you perform a search.
  • View Contents  This page displays the objects held in a given organizational unit, Managed Unit, or container.

To perform a batch operation, select the check box next to the name of each of the desired objects in the list, and then click a command in the top area of the Command pane. This executes the command on each object within your selection.

NOTE: Active Roles administrators can customize Web Interface by adding and removing commands, and modifying pages associated with commands. For more information, see “Customizing the Web Interface” in the Active Roles Web Interface Administration Guide.
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